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So What’s The Problem: Creating a Good Problem Presentation Slide

Real or perceived, a problem is what usually drives a customer to try a new product or service. Even if you offer your product for free, chances are that people won’t use it if it doesn’t help them solve their own concerns.

In creating your pitch presentation, you can’t just allot all of your time (and your slides) talking about your product’s effectiveness, value, ease of use, price, and various enticing feature. To get potential investors excited about your idea, they need to know about the issue that you want to solve.

According to career consultant, Shawn O’Connor, any business, whether you’re a budding startup or a big company, started out with a clear vision in mind, This vision isn’t only what you want to achieve or earn, but is often mostly also what your target market wants to earn from you.

You should show them that there is indeed a problem out there without an existing solution on the market. That is, other than the one you are offering. A good “problem presentation slide” is the best tool to use in this matter and help you build your case.

 

problem presentation slide

 

Before the Solution

The problem presentation slide is usually the second in a deck. You find it sandwiched between the elevator pitch, or overview, and the solution slides. This is, naturally, because the problem often comes before a solution. But also because this acknowledgement of the problem is what reels listeners in.

We’ve already established that people appreciate it when you know what they want. They’re willing to invest in a business that benefits them, rather than the other way around. Because of this, starting with the Problem slide before getting into the nitty-gritty of the solution you’ll be pitching is what actually interests them the most.

Make the presentation short and direct to the point, especially if you are presenting more than one problem. Use as few slides as possible in relating the problem to the audience. Preferably two to three will do. While you’ll want to elaborate your research on the market, lengthy presentations aren’t necessary. Just cut to the chase and pique their interests with key points.

Be the Solution

As it is, every problem presents an opportunity for a solution. Emphasize but do not exaggerate.

Your presentation should be enough to make your prospects believe that the market won’t be able to live without you. The description of your products should make the need for your product or service more pronounced and urgent. It should also set up the stage for your next slide: The Solution.

Conclusion

Every problem needs a solution — but often, this also goes the other way around. For a solution to come to mind, a well-defined problem is also necessary. Specifying a particular and plausible problem is the first step in creating your niche in the market.

Learn to leverage your brand with the right words and the right approach. Make sure to translate this on your deck for a convincing and effective presentation.

 

Reference

O’Connor, Shawn. “Step 1 for a Successful Startup: Identifying a Need in Your Community.” Forbes. April 9, 2013. Accessed May 16, 2014.

Why We Are Different: Creating A Slide That Highlights Your Competitive Edge

Today, most mainstream markets are becoming more and more saturated and difficult to penetrate, especially for budding entrepreneurs. This leads to companies and brands simply imitating each other in terms of features and benefits. But for those in these precarious market situations, customers have heard it all, and they’re not that impressed.

Defining your competitive edge can help establish your unique position in the market. With clearly defined benefits and features, your customers will know what really makes you a cut above the competitors and what steps you need to take to maintain that position.

Here’s how you can craft a slide stating your specific advantages:

Say it Fast

The “Why We Are Different” slide is a common fixture in corporate profile presentations.

Ironically, many organizations use the same strategy in describing the things that differentiate them from the crowd: They use bullet points. Enumerating your best qualities isn’t exactly the best way to present your competitive edge. If you can say it one sentence, the stronger your impact will be.

This doesn’t mean that you’ll be leaving out important details from your slide. It only means compressing the important points in one non-highfaluting and simple-to-understand sentence. Since we’re talking about customers who are tired of hearing the same things over and over, a brief but enlightening slide is a breath of fresh air for their tired gaze. Try to be as concise as possible in your slide. Don’t go off on tangent unless necessary.

why we are different

Back it Up

Another effective way to describe your edge over the competition is this: Don’t make it about the competition.

Make it client-driven. You can do this by identifying your customer base and describing the solution to their problem.

For most of your customers, you are the ideal provider not because of flashy advertising or due to popular choice, but because you are able to address their needs and challenges. In an interview with LoyalBlocks’ Ido Gaver, Kevin Daum enumerates the ways you can back up your statements and show your sincerity.

Show people that their loyalty to you has perks — whether it’s in terms of addressing them personally, or giving them perks like promos and freebies. Build and maintain your competitive edge on that opportunity.

Say it Loud

Now that you have an idea of what your competitive edge really is, it’s time to declare it to the world using your slide. You don’t need to use big, highfalutin words.

Simple words would be enough, as long as they sound sincere, not condescending and inappropriate. Use images to support your text. Make sure they are relevant and do not detract from what you want to say. An effective slide that aims to set you apart from the competition will only succeed if you bring together strategic techniques to the table.

 

Reference

Daum, Kevin. “7 Great Ways to Build Customer Loyalty.” Inc.com. January 13, 2014. Accessed May 15, 2014.

Why We Are Different: Highlighting Your Competitive Edge

Today, most mainstream markets are becoming more saturated and difficult to penetrate, especially for budding entrepreneurs. This leads to companies and brands simply imitating each other in terms of features and benefits. But for those in these precarious market situations, customers have heard it all, and they’re not that impressed.

Defining your competitive edge can help establish your unique position in the market. With clearly defined benefits and features, your customers will know what really makes you a cut above the competitors and what steps you need to take to maintain that position.

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Here’s how you can craft a slide stating your specific advantages:

Say it Fast

The “Why We Are Different” slide is a common fixture in corporate profile presentations.

Ironically, many organizations use the same strategy in describing the things that differentiate them from the crowd: They use bullet points. Enumerating your best qualities isn’t exactly the best way to present your competitive edge. If you can say it one sentence, the stronger your impact will be.

This doesn’t mean that you’ll be leaving out important details from your slide. It only means compressing the important points in one non-highfalutin and simple-to-understand sentence. Since we’re talking about customers who are tired of hearing the same things over and over, a brief but enlightening slide is a breath of fresh air for their tired gaze. Try to be as concise as possible in your slide. Don’t go off on tangent unless necessary.

why we are different

Back it Up

Another effective way to describe your edge over the competition is this: Don’t make it about the competition.

Make it client-driven. You can do this by identifying your customer base and describing the solution to their problem.

For most of your customers, you are the ideal provider not because of flashy advertising or due to popular choice, but because you are able to address their needs and challenges. In an interview with LoyalBlocks’ Ido Gaver, Kevin Daum enumerates the ways you can back up your statements and show your sincerity.

Show people that their loyalty to you has perks—whether it’s in terms of addressing them personally, or giving them perks like promos and freebies. Build and maintain your competitive edge on that opportunity.

Say it Loud

Now that you have an idea of what your competitive edge really is, it’s time to declare it to the world using your slide. You don’t need to use big, highfalutin words.

Simple words would be enough, as long as they sound sincere, not condescending and inappropriate. Use images to support your text. Make sure they are relevant and do not detract from what you want to say. An effective slide that aims to set you apart from the competition will only succeed if you bring together strategic techniques to the table.

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Putting Together a Powerful Company Mission

A company’s mission statement defines your organization’s primary purpose. Basically, its purpose is to describe the reason of its existence. Mission statements are usually limited to one paragraph, but if you can explain it in only a few sentences, the better. All you have to mention are some key aspects such as your company’s objectives and what it hopes to accomplish.

If you are making a pitch to potential investors or introducing your company in a trade exhibit, your presentation slides should include your mission statement. Think of it as your chance to establish your organization’s identity and credibility, a chance to explain who you are.

HartPrecision-SG10

 

What’s it For?

Consider your mission statement as the driving force behind your company’s aspirations, shaping both your internal corporate culture and your target market’s perception of your brand or company name.

Before you start drafting a mission statement, you need to know yourself — and your intended customers. According to Success Design‘s Mandy Porta, determining your target market involves a thorough survey not only of the people you’re aiming to sell your product or service to, but also of the market situation as a whole. Is there a gap in the market that you can address? Who will be willing to buy your products? What is the competition doing, and how can you do it better?

Once you’ve gotten past this preliminary self-examination, you’ll have a better grasp of who you are as a company.

Writing the Mission Statement

Developing a strong mission statement would take some time. You can’t just string together some big words and call it your mission. You and your team should discuss it among yourselves to ensure that every word truly represents who you are as a company.

Before putting anything on your PowerPoint slide, here are a few questions that you should ask:

  • What do we do?
  • Why did we start this business?
  • What do we offer to the market?
  • Who are our clients?
  • How do we treat our clients?
  • What image does our business convey to the market?

Conclusion

One of the expected outcomes of answering those questions is that you would be able to identify your company’s winning solution. This refers to the concept that makes you stand out from the competition.

It is the thing that drives customers to your doorstep. Identifying that winning solution will also lead you to determine your standards of success. Combining your winning solution and your standards of success will enable you to reach to a measurable goal or a mission.

Choose your words carefully. Put everything into paper (or slide) once you have a clear and concise statement of that mission.

 

References

Porta, Mandy. “How to Define Your Target Market.” Inc.com. June 22, 2010. Accessed May 14, 2014.