Slidegenius, Inc.

Creating Creativity: Creative Habits to Practice Everyday

Successful people think outside the box and offer something new every time. Fortunately, according to Sir Ken Robinson in his famous TED Talk “Do Schools Kill Creativity?” everyone has the capacity to be creative. It’s just a matter of perspective and persistence.

Making creativity a habit can boost your performance. You’ll be able to keep your audience interested with your originality.  However, the benefits of ingenuity aren’t limited to your professional life. Practice it every day to become a happier, better-rounded individual.

Look for Inspiration Everywhere

Fresh material can be found in the most unexpected places. Resourceful thinkers let their minds and bodies wander to find original ideas. Daydreaming allows your brain to branch out into different possibilities, which is essential for creative thinking. You actually come up with the best concepts when you least expect them. Try getting fresh air and step outside to look for inspiration.

But being on the go not only helps you find your muse, it also literally improves your thought process. Studies provide evidence on the correlation between physical movement and cognitive activity. The next time you come across a mental block, consider going out for a run.

Passion Precedes Excellence

A project done half-heartedly is bound to fail. Creative people know this, so they give their all in their work, and the results follow. While committing yourself to one thing seems tedious, single-tasking can be very rewarding. Focusing on one project gives you more time to scrutinize and polish its quality.

Because this requires a lot of patience, you have to really be interested in what you’re working on to keep going at it. It doesn’t have to be your immediate interest. It just has to be something you’re willing to invest effort in.

Angel investor and entrepreneur Amy Rees Anderson, writes in her article on Forbes that passionate pursuit yields monetary return, citing examples such as Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg. The more enthusiastic you are, the higher the chances are of a good result.

Criticism Nurtures Growth of Ideas

People are naturally social beings. Finding like-minded individuals who can share your vision and assist your progress is crucial in the creative process. Although originality seems personal, making connections and collaborating with others can help you come up with better ideas.

Ed Catmull, co-founder and current president of Pixar and Disney Animation Studios, discloses the process behind Pixar’s creative successes in an article on the Harvard Business Review. In his definition of creativity, Catmull debunks the misconception of creativity as a “mysterious solo act” and instead emphasizes the collaboration of great minds in producing good output. Those who seek out communities to foster imagination and growth are more likely to succeed in their craft than people who remain solitary.

For one thing, other people won’t know your work exists if you keep it to yourself. For another, getting feedback allows you to improve on skills. In the case of a presenter, showing your content and visuals to your peers or to other experts gives you different perspectives on your presentation.

After all, an audience will look at it in the end, so why not get constructive opinions now? Being around other creatives can also build a network of ideas that you can tap into anytime.

Conclusion

Creativity has many benefits. It enhances your personal and professional life. Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t limited to a chosen few, either. To achieve creative thought, simply go out of your comfort zone and explore. You can get inspiration from everything around you.

Work hard and be patient in crafting your ideas into worthwhile output. When you’re ready to let your work be known, surround yourself with people who are willing to support you and give you feedback. It’s a healthy practice to integrate creativity into your daily routine.

Need help making a creative and stimulating presentation? Contact our SlideGenius experts and get a free quote!

 

References

Anderson, Amy. “Does Being Passionate About the Work You Do Increase Your Chance of Succes?”. Forbes Magazine. Accessed October 9, 2015. www.forbes.com/sites/amyanderson/2013/03/27/does-being-passionate-about-the-work-you-do-increase-your-chance-of-success
Catmull, Edwin. “How Pixar Fosters Collective Creativity.” Harvard Business Review. September 1, 2008. Accessed October 9, 2016. www.hbr.org/2008/09/how-pixar-fosters-collective-creativity
Chan, Amanda. “Regular Exercise Could Boost Creativity.” The Huffington Post. December 9, 2013. Accessed October 9, 2015. www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/09/exercise-creativity-physical-activity_n_4394310.html

Featured Image: “Chalk” by Dean Hochman on flickr.com

What Poetry and Presentation Content Have in Common

You might think poetry and presentations are in completely opposite planes. Both are just different ways of communicating and expressing new ideas. While poetry focuses on artful interpretation, presentation content requires you to be concise and straight to the point. You’ll be surprised that despite this obvious conflict, there are ways that poetry and presentation content overlap with each other.

SlideGenius Blog Module One

We redesign PowerPoint presentations.

Get your free quote now.

get a free quote

Here are ways presentation content can mirror poetry in other ways.

Strong images

Like poetry, great presentation content contains strong images. It’s not enough that you have images in your slides. You also need to integrate powerful imagery in your choice of words. Consider how the poet Ezra Pound perfectly set up a familiar scenario in just a few words:

 In a Station of the Metro

The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
Petals on a wet, black bough.

Similarly, your presentation content should be able to ignite the imagination of your audience with more descriptive and active words.Pair these words with powerful pictures in your slides and you’ll surely keep your audience engaged for a long time.

Analogies and metaphors

Poets take abstract concepts and liken them to more concrete and relatable things.  For example, in William Shakespeare’s famous sonnet, he describes a beloved by comparing her to a “summer’s day.” While your presentation content doesn’t have to be as lengthy as a Shakespearean sonnet, you should also make sure that your ideas are as clear and digestible as possible.

You might as well talk of the abstract when you discuss complicated data without simplifying it. To help your audience fully grasp a complex topic, use common metaphors and analogies in your explanation. Use something you know they’ll be able to relate to, like a scene from a famous movie or rules of a popular sport.

Structure

Poems follow a specific structure that helps reader follow its internal rhythm. Even if a certain poem is written in free verse, it still has specific patterns that allow readers to see the natural flow of words.

The same thing should be present in your presentation content. Structuring your presentation content makes it easier for your audience to follow what you’re saying. Determine the logical flow of your ideas by starting with a storyboard.

Like presentations, poems can take on different forms. Sonnets typically tackle love and romance. Epics follow the adventure of a hero. Some poets prefer to write in free verse. Similarly, the type of presentation you’re going to prepare for will depend on the topic and context.

Your presentation can be a sales pitch, or it can be informative and educational. It can also be a report that’s driven heavily by data. In all these scenarios, your presentation won’t look and sound the same, just like a poem would.

Embrace your inner presentation poet with these tips and craft a winning pitch and deck to match!

SlideGenius Blog Module One

Download free PowerPoint templates now.

Get professionally designed PowerPoint slides weekly.

Sign Up Now

Featured Image: Martin Pettitt via Flickr