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The Force of a Great Presentation [Video]

In a corporate galaxy far, far away, an empire of bad presentations wreaked havoc among speakers and audiences alike.

Their careless bullet points and cluttered slides bored people to death.

It’s time to step out of the dark side and engage your listeners. Let’s end the reign of wordy slides and uninspiring images by reinventing your presentation.

How, you ask?

Learn how to channel the force of a great presentation with this video from our SlideGenius experts.

Watch and share this video!

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Stop the forces of bad presentations with our tips.

1. Keep It Simple

Free your slides from too much information. To make your pitch understandable, reduce your text to key points you can expound on.

You can also use images instead of text to show exactly what you’re talking about. Powerful visuals attract attention and reel people in by stirring strong emotions they’ll associate with your pitch later on.

2. Make It Visual

Back up your main ideas with striking visuals that will grab people’s attention and keep them interested.

People process visual information faster than raw data, so make sure these images reflect the impact you want to make on your audience.

3. Consider Good Design

Your deck design matters in connecting with your prospects. Arrange your overall layout so everything in your slides contribute to your message.

Things like color, space, and contrast factor in a lot when it comes to creating a visually appealing deck.

4. Liven Up Your Pitch

At the same time, energize everyone and keep them attentive throughout your pitch.

Balance out any overly serious content with strategic humor that’s appropriate for the speech you’re giving.

5. Build Audience Rapport

Elevating the mood lifts up your listeners’ spirits and eases any lingering tension.

The relaxed atmosphere will get your audience to invest in your offer and let your presentation move along quicker.

May the force be with you.

Save the universe from death by PowerPoint by putting an end to these bad presentation habits.

Use these five tips to improve your skills as a presenter and bring life back to your audience.

We are the presentation experts you’re looking for. Contact us now for a free quote!

7 Deadly Presentation Sins: Envy (Losing Yourself)

Welcome back to our series on the Seven Deadly Sins of Presentations. Last time, we discussed sloth or failing to prepare for your speech.

Today, we’ll be exploring the sin of envy.

For speakers, this means lacking authenticity and losing confidence.

Let’s see what makes envy a speech killer.

What Is Envy?

Envy inevitably leads to personal harm and debilitation, affecting one’s physical, spiritual, and emotional well-being (Job 5:2; Prov 14:30).

Usually denoted by a green-eyed monster, it is characterized by jealousy over others’ traits, statuses, abilities, or situations.

Some studies claim that envy can be productive for encouraging personal growth. Indeed, data suggests envy boosts mental persistence and memory.

In public speaking, however, envy can be destructive.

Why Is It Bad for Presentations?

Admiring great speakers’ exceptional presentation skills isn’t bad when they push you to reach your highest potential.

It only becomes unprofessional when jealousy overpowers inspiration.

If you’re envious of a colleague or somebody’s speaking prowess, drop that negative feeling now.

It’s a bad habit that stops you from recognizing your own strengths and abilities because you overly focus on somebody else’s, losing sight of your own unique strengths.

It could also cause you to copy their speaking style, making you less authentic and confident.

How Do We Cure the Deadly Sin of Envy?

Curing the sin of envy takes one approach: self-affirmation.

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Listing down your weaknesses helps you figure out which one is the easiest to remedy—be it  writing your content, designing your slide or your actual speech delivery.

Knowing what your biggest weakness is also allows you to think of appropriate techniques that best work for you.

Summing It Up

Being envious of someone’s presentation aptitude is a sin that kills confident and authentic public speaking.

Instead of sabotaging yourself through envy, bring in compassion and motivate yourself to become a better presenter.

Don’t focus on somebody else’s strengths. Instead, look for your own strengths which no other person has.

Identify your weaknesses, too, so that you can address them and improve your own skills.

Once you’ve started focusing on your own capabilities instead of comparing yourself with other people, you’ll be able to hone your own work to the point that you’ll have people’s attention – the positive kind.

Are you in need of PowerPoint slides that match your presentation goals? Contact SlideGenius and we’ll help you design a deck with a selling edge!

References

Dlugan, Andrew. “The 7 Deadly Sins of Public Speaking.” Six Minutes, October 25, 2009. Accessed June 11, 2015. http://sixminutes.dlugan.com/7-deadly-sins-public-speaking/
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-new-brain/201109/eat-your-guts-out-why-envy-hurts-and-why-its-good-your-brain.