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How Repurposing Presentations Can Boost Content Marketing Efforts

A lot of time and resources can be spent crafting beautiful and effective presentations.

After all, they’re the cornerstone of sales and marketing efforts—and made right, are highly effective in driving success.

But we don’t just mean in slide deck format. Because whether it’s a presentation that gets used frequently or not, hidden inside it is a treasure trove of additional content possibilities. 

They just need to be teased out.

Repurposing presentations is a great strategy any business can take advantage of.

Don’t worry, it’s not lazy or unoriginal to reuse good content. On the contrary. It actually offers your business tremendous benefits! 

You’ll get consistency across collateral and conserve your marketing budget for other important projects. Plus, you’ll have assets at-the-ready, enabling you to roll out marketing efforts quicker and with better consistency. 

The key is in repurposing presentations properly, which this posts addresses.

Use Individual Slides as Images

If your presentation was designed with best practices in mind, it’s sure to have more than a few visually appealing slides.

Don’t be afraid to take these individual slides out of the deck and use them as images alongside other marketing collateral.

Images for Blog Posts

Blog posts are a great example. 

If your deck has a slide about product benefits, use it as a visual aid for a blog post about that product.

Adding visual elements like images and videos (more on videos later) to blog posts enhances reader experience.

Just like for presentations, visual aids increase engagement, reinforce concepts (when done correctly), and ultimately keep readers reading — remember, the length of time readers spend on your posts is one of the most important SEO signals search engines pay attention to.

For example, you can see how the second slide in the following Zillow presentation could be re-purposed as a supporting image for a blog post covering the top real estate markets:

Images for Product & Service Pages

The purpose of a marketing presentation is to sell and the same goes for the product/service pages or landing pages on your website. 

Taking a few benefits-driven slides from the deck and using them as visuals on these types of web pages is the perfect way to capture visitor intrigue and answer basic questions.

One way to do this is to transform individual slides into a beautiful downloadable sell sheet and offer it on pertinent product or services pages to measure user intent.

The best part about this is that your slide deck is already branded, making them a seamless fit for your website.

Images for Social Media Posts & Promotional Ad Campaigns

Another great place to use slides as images is on social media. 

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn are all visually-driven platforms (and we all know that posts with images and videos see much higher engagement rates than text-based posts). 

The right presentation slides can be a quick and easy way to populate your feed with social-ready graphics. They convey meaningful messaging in a branded way—all you need to do is come up with snappy post copy and crop the images appropriately.

For example, with a bit of editing, any one of the following slides could be used as Caterpillar’s LinkedIn “pinned” post, which the company isn’t taking advantage of (at least at the time this article was published):

The pinned post can link to a case study, a blog post on Caterpillar’s recent social responsibility efforts, an industry guide…you get the idea.

Heck, even Caterpillar’s LinkedIn cover photo can be revamped using the first slide in the group above.

Don’t forget about PPC and social ads, too. 

Whether you’re running a brand awareness campaign or retargeting to existing customers, branded and benefits-driven visuals will boost the success of your ad campaign. Just keep in mind that some social media platforms (Facebook especially) don’t like text-heavy ad images, so you’ll probably need to make some edits to the slides first.

Convert Your Presentation into a Beautiful Infographic (or collection of infographics)

A good slide deck conveys everything a person needs to know about a topic.

If you’re pitching a product or service, the deck will have robust data and analysis to project these benefits to people. 

This type of data is also ideal for infographics.

You may not realize it, but your presentation likely already includes the building blocks for an infographic (or two). 

Go through a deck and start pulling out slides, data and graphics that tell a story—then, consolidate them into a beautiful and informative infographic.

Start with one big infographic. This one might take a little scrolling on the part of a customer, but it’ll be worth it! A comprehensive infographic will tell them everything they need to know about your industry, product, service, or brand story in one condensed image. 

There’s no need for a 30-slide deck—a 30-second infographic can sum it all up.

Bite-sized infographics are also valuable. Pick a point and create a smaller infographic that harps on this one facet of the presentation. These mini infographics are great for social sharing, email blasts, and ad buys. They’re digestible in seconds and make a bold statement in just as little time.

Whether you create a big, engaging infographic or parcel presentation data out into smaller concepts, the goal is the same: Lead generation. Infographics are great lead-gen tools, and they’re readily borne from a well-made sales and marketing presentation.

Here are some great examples of infographics crafted from information in presentations:

Convert Your Presentation into an Engaging Video

Slide decks are almost videos as-is. 

Think about the difference between manually clicking through slides and having them play automatically every 8-10 seconds, with a transition in-between. That’s a video! 

It sounds cheesy, but actually has a ton of practical applications.

Company Lobby Videos

Do the TV screens in your lobby need a content refresh?

If any of your presentations illustrate your company’s origin story, purpose or values, convert it into a video and add it to the content carousel that’s running in your company lobby.

Here’s an example of a a video created from re-purposed slides. You can see how it could be used as an “About Us” video in a company communal or waiting area:

Convert a Webinar Deck into a Video

Remember that slideshow you used for that educational webinar?

Record the voiceover, sync it up to the slideshow in a video, and:

  • disseminate it in a customer newsletter
  • upload it to a video-sharing site (like YouTube and Wistia), or
  • “gate” it behind a lead-generation offer (if it’s valuable enough) and advertise it on social media

The possibilities are truly endless.

Share on Video-sharing Sites

As stated above, whatever you decide to do with your video, make sure to upload it to sites like YouTube (you’ll reap the SEO benefits from the world’s second-largest search engine), Vimeo, Wistia, and other video-sharing sites for easy and extra exposure.

Internal Training Videos

The same goes for a training video for internal teams. 

With videos, people can pause, rewind and play at half or double speed in video format, making it easier to follow along and retain information.

Product/Service Videos

Another great slideshow-to-video idea is to extract individual slides and combine them into a targeted short video for a product or service page. 

These videos don’t have to be more than 30 seconds and can play automatically alongside product listings, in social feeds, or in standalone video ads.

Social Media “Stories

Finally, there’s social media to consider. 

Video is huge on social platforms! Facebook and Instagram in particular reward video content with more exposure, which can bring much-needed attention to your product. 

Adding these short product videos to the “stories” feature of these platforms only serves to increase exposure to them.

Convert Your Presentation into a Free (or Lead-Generating) eBook

On-the-go readers appreciate having access to downloadable content they can take with them and read on their own time.

That’s why eBooks and guides are still popular content assets.

So, take the slides you’ve already designed, combine them with existing blog posts on the same topic, and bring them together in an informative eBook!

Naturally, the most useful eBooks or guides will come from presentations that are more “educational” in nature. For example, if your CEO recently gave a keynote presentation on the trends of the industry your company operates in, this is perfect content to be re-purposed into a beautiful downloadable industry report.

eBooks don’t have to be long—under 10 pages is common, and they’re great for showcasing your expertise, improving brand exposure, and establishing you as a credible resource.

Offer an eBook for free on your website as supporting content or charge a small fee on Amazon Kindle (only if the content is valuable enough!) for people to tap into that knowledge. 

Finally, consider offering it as a free download after someone provides their email address. It’s a tried and true lead-gen solution that’ll help you capitalize on your marketing collateral.

Here’s an excerpt from an eBook we created from a slide deck on data visualization:

You can download the full eBook here.

Integrate the Presentation into Print Materials

The options for repurposing a presentation are endless when it comes to print materials. 

Slides can easily become part of brochures, flipbooks, direct mail pieces, postcards, handouts, rack cards and just about anything else. 

Depending on your audience and the message you’re trying to send, a single deck could yield several rounds of print collateral!

Make the Most of Your Presentations!

If you’ve designed your presentations effectively, the content from them can (and should) live on long after the presentation has ended.

Smart marketers will realize the potential of the material and adapt it to other efforts, creating consistent, coherent messaging.

Use the ‘rule of three’ as an example. A piece of content should have a minimum three uses before it’s retired:

  • Presentation → infographic → social post, or
  • Presentation → blog post → eBook

No matter the collateral you create or how you use it, make sure it originates from your well-designed presentations. 

The Overwhelmed Creative Team: A Cautionary “Design Ops” Tale

Back in 2011, fresh out of college, I worked for an advertising agency in New York City as an account manager.

It was one of the most stressful jobs I’ve ever had.

One of my responsibilities was overseeing the creation of my clients’ pitch decks, which — unsurprisingly — weren’t considered “mission critical” deliverables for the creative team.

There was never time to be idle; we were always on the go, brainstorming, producing content, and running to client meetings. The job was stressful but we were fortunate to have the right people that were easy to work with, passionate, and fun.

Over the next year though, the team began to thin. Some members left for bigger opportunities, others were poached by competing agencies, and some even started their own businesses.

Eventually, most of our veterans in the creative department were gone and the empty seats were filled with junior art directors and copywriters. 

I remember being worried about how things would unfold without some of the key employees I had come to rely on. Everyone had to step up. 

And for a while, everything ran smoothly. But as the agency grew and workloads increased, our internal design processes began to break down.

The creative team — consisting mostly of junior employees — were overwhelmed with pitch deck projects. At one point, they were unable to handle one of the decks assigned to them.

I remember it like it was yesterday…

As the account manager, I had to keep things moving and decided to just make the deck myself. 

Never did I think creating the PowerPoint deck would stress me out. After all, I’d used the tool for years to present my school reports and projects. The pre-loaded animations were there for the choosing and I knew I could find some cool-looking pre-designed templates somewhere online and simply visit YouTube for “design hack” tutorials.

Boy was I wrong.

See, the problem is that we’ve all worked with PowerPoint for years (even decades) and we trick ourselves into thinking we know enough.

Think about that for a moment.

That’s basically saying because we’ve driven cars since we were 16 years old, we feel comfortable with how the machine works.

In reality, most of us only know how to get from Point A to Point B (in most cases), and keep ourselves comfortable along the way.

We don’t know how to make the car more fuel efficient, or give it more horsepower to make it faster, or how to adjust the shocks for more on-road comfort or off-road capability—things that would undoubtedly benefit us in our week-to-week (depending on one’s lifestyle of course).

Instead, we use the same vehicle in its original configuration until it’s time to move on—because that’s what we’re used to.

If you think about it, that’s basically the same as downloading a pre-designed template that appears suitable, uploading content, and then hitting the proverbial gas pedal.

I felt I knew enough about PowerPoint to make the pitch deck acceptable.

Let’s be clear: when the goal for any project is “acceptable,” it’s safe to assume—in this day and age—it probably won’t move any needles in the right direction.

To no-one’s surprise, I came up with an almost plain deck with cheesy animations. You know, your typical box-in, appear, dissolve-type effects—stuff that causes Death by PowerPoint and makes you look old.

Fortunately, my presentation skills were good enough to outshine my unoriginal slides and the materials my creative team came up with were downright beautiful. 

But just seeing how the deck came out was a humbling experience. It was definitely something I was not proud of. I used to be so giddy presenting with the spectacular decks that our creative team came up with, but for this presentation, my deck was as good as just writing on the board with a marker

Heck, a whiteboard session might have even been more engaging than what I came up with. What’s worse is I could’ve had more hours to sleep and focus on what I was going to say rather than spend so much time on the deck.

The lesson here is pretty clear: we aren’t necessarily experts when we’ve done something many times, and just knowing “enough” is never good enough in high stakes environments like sales presentations, boardroom meetings, and keynote speeches (among others).

Whether you’re guiding a prospect through a product demo, trying to garner buy-in in the boardroom, or announcing upcoming products at your company’s annual internal conference, your ability to achieve the goals you set out to accomplish with your presentation rests on four key factors: 

1) Your presentation skills (obviously)

2) The narrative of your presentation

3) The design quality of your visual aid (typically a PowerPoint deck), and

4) MOST IMPORTANTLY: your audience’s level of engagement

Thankfully, I had the first one—but imagine what my team could have accomplished if we had all four!

PowerPoint Hyperlinks: Creating an Interactive Deck

If you’re exhibiting at a trade show or convention, you need to set up a booth that can catch everyone’s attention. We talked about how to make video loops in the past. This will give people passing by your display a brief introduction to your brand. When that catches their interest, provide more information with an interactive presentation deck. You can easily create on through the use of PowerPoint hyperlinks.

PowerPoint hyperlinks allow you to jump to specific slides quickly. It can also serve as a command to switch to a second presentation or open a different document. Here’s a quick tutorial to go about it:

Step One

Start by creating your presentation as you normally would. Add an initial slide you’re planning to use at a trade show should start with a slide that will serve as a “homepage”. This is where you’re going to put all the hyperlinks that will lead to specific parts of your presentation. Forgo the usual title slide for a homepage slide instead.

Step Two

When you’ve finished building your deck, go back to the first slide. You can use any object as a PowerPoint hyperlink. It can be a picture, shape, or text. Whatever you decide to use, arrange them in any way you like. Just keep in mind that you should have an object to correspond for each part of the presentation you want to link to.

Here’s an example so you can visualize it:

powerpoint hyperlinks 01

Step Three

Now that you have your objects arranged, you can start making PowerPoint hyperlinks. All you have to do is to select the object you want to use, right-click, and choose Hyperlink.

powerpoint hyperlinks 03

 

If you want to link to a particular slide in your presentation, choose Place in This Document and select a slide from the list. If you want to open a different file or a web page, click on Existing File or Web Page. You can also link to your email address so visitors can easily send in their details.

powerpoint hyperlinks 02

Important note: If you’re using a different computer for the trade show, make sure you transfer your presentation and the files you want to link to. Keep everything in one place to make this step easier for you.

Step Four

When you’ve finished making each hyperlink, don’t forget to give it a test run. You don’t want broken links when people start viewing your presentation deck.

That’s it! It doesn’t take a lot to create an interesting experience for your prospects. All you have to do is think outside the box. Consider making an interactive presentation for your trade show booth. Practice using PowerPoint hyperlinks. Soon, you’ll be building even more complex and professional-looking slides.

 

Featured Image: Elco van Staveren via Flickr

Create a Captivating Presentation with Bright PowerPoint Backgrounds

Creating an impact as you get your message across is the ultimate goal of your PowerPoint presentation. To achieve this, your slides have to be planned and designed carefully. One of the things that can contribute to this is a bright background.

Ideally, PowerPoint backgrounds should be simple and clear as the main focus should be on the message and not on than the slide. With just the right brightness, the background can improve your presentations and ‘wow’ your audience.

Below are some ways a bright background can enhance your slides. Just one important reminder: Anything that is way too much can be bad. Having said that, what we’re going to talk about here is tolerable brightness for your PowerPoint backgrounds.

Allows the visuals to stand out

Apart from making the slides easy on the eyes, the contrast between them makes the texts readable. Graphic designer Matt Cronin explains that readability is one way in attracting your audience visually.

A bright background and a darker font color create a great combination. Some graphics will also stand out when placed on a bright-colored background. Using any one of these techniques may be beneficial to you in the long run.

After all, people don’t want to look at something they can’t understand.

Focuses the audience’s attention

If you don’t want to use a plain background but still want something bright, then you may want to use radial gradient with a rather bright center. The depth this adds to your chosen image or slide background not only makes it interesting, this also engages the viewer’s gaze more.

This background creates a highlight effect, which looks like a glow. When you use this effect, make sure to create the right balance to keep the glow from hindering readability.

Evokes positive emotion

Bright colors such as yellow and orange evoke a bright and sunny day. They seem to create a lot of positive energy. As bright colors generate feelings of joy and vitality, your audience are sure to feel quite comfortable and at ease throughout your presentation.

Indeed, a bright PowerPoint background has its benefits. It can enhance slides more than what dark backgrounds can do. When used with white texts, dark slide backgrounds can be hard on the eyes. Dark backgrounds just don’t have the same effect that you get from brighter ones.

Final Words

Bright backgrounds are appealing and eye-catching, but at the same time, don’t overdo them. This word of caution stems from the fact that bad combinations can lead to worse results.

Out-of-place neon colors can hurt the eyes and disrupt the senses, rather than draw viewers to your presentation. Use bright colors wisely and attract people to your deck in no time!

 

References

Cronin, Matt. “10 Principles For Readable Web Typography.” Smashing Magazine. March 18, 2009. Accessed May 23, 2014.
How Color Impacts Emotions and Behaviors.” 99Designs. 2011. Accessed May 23, 2014.

 

About SlideGenius

SlideGenius.com is your business PPT guru. Based in San Diego, California, SlideGenius has helped more than 500 international clients enhance their presentations, including those of J.P. Morgan, Harley-Davidson, Pfizer, Verizon, and Reebok. Call us at 1.858.217.5144 and let SlideGenius help you with your presentation today!

Jazz Up Your Sales Presentation With a Label Tag Created in PowerPoint

Using images to represent ideas is one of the best ways to enhance PowerPoint presentations. A product label tag, for example, is great in designing your deck during a sales presentation. According to Entrepreneur, in such presentations, it’s essential to establish your identity and address your customers’ needs.

If ever you need a tag to back up your points and differentiate yourself from the competition, you can always search for custom images of these tags on the Internet and tweak them to your advantage.

Or better yet, create one that you can easily customize using the Shape functionality in PowerPoint. This tutorial will show you how to do it using the Shape and Text tools in PowerPoint 2010.

Drawing the Frame

First, assuming that your PowerPoint is already open, create a new, blank slide. Then, draw the label using the Rectangular shape with a rounded border. You can find this in the Insert tab under Shapes.

 

label tag

 

After this, select the Oval shape from the Shapes option to create a small circular shape. Put this near the top portion of the rectangle to serve as the label’s tag hole.

Filling with Color

Fill the circle with the same color as that of the slide background. Do this by right-clicking on the shape and selecting the Format Shape option. Click Fill and then select Slide background fill.

label tag2

 

To give the label some depth, you may want to fill it with gradient color. To do this, click Fill from the Format Shape option and select Gradient fill. Depending on your preference, you may adjust the Gradient type, direction, color, brightness, and other qualities.

label tag3

Final Details

To create the label’s string, select the curve line from the Shapes option. Draw a line from the small circle and then click twice until you reach the label’s border. You may manipulate the string to give it a more natural look. Simply click on it and drag any of the visible points accordingly.

label tag6

Lastly, you’ll have to group all the shapes in a single label. Select all the elements and then right click on the label. Next, click on Group (and the other Group option that will appear) and

Next, click on Group (and the other Group option that will appear) and Voila! You now have your very own product label tag that you can use for your sales presentation. For added impact, think about adding some text inside the tags.

label tag7

Conclusion

An impressive deck is often eye-catching and unique, but more importantly, it should always be there to support you when you need to pitch to the crowd. Experiment with PowerPoint and add a tag to your slides. It’s simple and interesting. With just a few clicks using the Shapes tool, you’ll already have a tag-shaped image that you can spice up with text or gradients for depth.

Having trouble with your deck design? Our SlideGenius experts are always ready to help. Contact us today for a free quote!

 

Reference

Making Sales Presentations.” Entrepreneur. February 24, 2013. Accessed May 15, 2014.

About SlideGenius

SlideGenius.com is your business Power Point presentation expert. Based in San Diego, California, SlideGenius has helped more than 500 international clients enhance their presentations, including those of J.P. Morgan, Harley-Davidson, Pfizer, Verizon, and Reebok. Call us at 1.858.217.5144 and let SlideGenius help you with your presentation today!