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How to Loop a GIF Background in PowerPoint 2013

Animation can easily capture audience interest, especially if they’re engaging and interactive. Backing up your pitch with well-designed motion graphics encourages the crowd to listen. Include motion graphics as backgrounds with PowerPoint to spice up your business presentation.

In this post, we’ll focus on using an animated GIF (Graphic Interchange Format) and how to use it as a background with the help of PowerPoint 2013’s customization options.

Loop a GIF in PowerPoint 2013

Before doing this, you’ll need to have an animated GIF image ready.

Once you have your file ready, here’s how you can place it on your slide:

1. Click the Design tab and then to the far right, select Format Background under the Customize group. You’ll notice the Format Background options appear at the right windowpane within the slide area.

Loop a gif background tips: New

2. In this window, choose the Picture or Texture Fill from the options.

Loop a gif background tips: picture or texture fill

3. Within the same window, click File to insert the GIF from your downloaded or saved files and then choose your desired GIF file.

Loop a gif background tips: choose file

4. Preview your current slide to see if the GIF plays. Under the Slide Show tab, click From Current Slide in the Start Slide Show group, or simply press Shift+F5 to preview the current slide you’re working on. The GIF will automatically loop at the start of the slide.

Loop a gif background tips: gif

Some Important Reminders

1. Click on Apply to All so that your GIF will play in the background of all your slides.

Loop a gif background tips: apply to all

2. You can see this button at the bottom of the Format Background window pane which can be accessed in the rightmost area of the Design tab.

Loop a gif background tips: format background

3. You can also choose other GIFs as backgrounds to invoke different reactions from your audience. This option stretches the image to fill the background, so choose a high-quality GIF so that it won’t look pixelated when expanded.

4. Last, but not the least, not all GIFs can loop properly when played in older versions of PowerPoint. Focus on your presentation’s content in case your animation fails to load.

5. The steps outlined in this article are distinctly different from just dragging a GIF into the slide area. You can’t resize or drag the GIF around once it’s applied as a background. This feature helps reduce the amount of slide elements in your deck and keeps the background firmly in place.

Background Animation

With PowerPoint’s capability to customize slides, you can add animation to pique the interest of your audience.

The ability to loop a GIF background can enhance your design and vary up your presentation’s look. A moving background can catch the attention of the audience, which can help them focus on the foreground elements afterwards. An animated design also helps differentiate your slide elements for visual contrast. This lets you deliver a memorable PowerPoint presentation.

Create a more dynamic and engaging deck with animation. SlideGenius experts can assist you and offer you a free quote!

 

Reference:

Menezes, Ryan. “How to Use Looping Backgrounds in PowerPoint.” Business & Entrepreneurship. n.d. yourbusiness.azcentral.com/use-looping-backgrounds-powerpoint-1766.html

How to Open the .ODP Format Using PowerPoint 2013

The OpenOffice program’s OpenDocument Presentation (.odp) format is mostly used by professionals as a “lighter” alternative to Microsoft PowerPoint. The free software suite is an open-source program used for word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, graphics, and other business endeavors, much like its paid counterpart. OpenOffice can also store lecture materials, documents, and business presentations.

While this may save costs for investing in the “heavier” Office Suite, the main issue is the .odp file format’s several incompatibilities with the Office Suite.

PowerPoint’s flexibility lets you open OpenDocument Presentation (.odp) files without a need to set up any tools or programs on your desktop or laptop. Just open the document as it is and view it from inside the program.

Some features of PowerPoint, such as SmartArt and transition sounds, aren’t supported by the OpenDocument Presentation format. So a PowerPoint user might have to make several accommodations for an OpenOffice user and vice versa, which takes time.

However, compatibility issues don’t make it impossible to open .odp in PowerPoint.

How to Open the .ODP Format Using PowerPoint 2013

1. Open Microsoft PowerPoint 2013.

open PPT 20132. Click the File tab and you’ll be taken to the Backstage view. Click on Open in the vertical ribbon.

click File3. Select the Computer icon and choose Browse. A dialog box named Open will appear.

choose Browse4. Make it easier to find your file by filtering your documents to only show “.odp” files. You can do this by clicking on the dropdown menu named All PowerPoint Presentations in the bottom right corner of the dialog box named Open.

Click on the dropdown menu named All PowerPoint Presentations5. Select OpenDocument Presentation from the dropdown menu.

Select OpenDocument Presentation6. Now, open your OpenDocument Presentation file.Open OpenDocument Presentation file

Important Information about the .ODP Format

Opening an OpenDocument Presentation might show up differently in PowerPoint 2013 because both programs don’t have all of each other’s supported features. Take a look at this list from Office.com to see which features of .odp are supported in PowerPoint.

Since compatibility is a major concern between the two programs, it’s best not to use advanced animations and complex transitions, especially those with sounds from PowerPoint. These won’t be able to show up in an OpenDocument Presentation.

Another step you should take is to check your .pptx file before forwarding it to your colleague or client. When you send the presentation as an .odp file, see if it looks the same when viewed in OpenOffice.

To make sure your formatted objects made from PowerPoint appear in OpenOffice, convert the formatted elements into an image in your PowerPoint file so that it can be viewed in an OpenOffice Presentation. Take note that when you save your charts or shapes as an image, you won’t be able to edit it afterwards.

Yes, PowerPoint Can Definitely Open .ODP!

Make sure to follow each step above to help you open this file format. Don’t forget to consult the list from Microsoft Office for concerns on compatibility.

To help you with your presentation needs, our PowerPoint professionals can help you out with a free quote!

 

References:

Bennet, Kirk. “How to Open .Odp Files on PowerPoint.” Business & Entrepreneurship. n.d. yourbusiness.azcentral.com/open-odp-files-powerpoint-4304.html
“Supported Features in OpenDocument Presentation (.odp) Format.” Office. n.d. support.office.com/en-us/article/Supported-features-in-OpenDocument-presentation-odp-format-f6d5b015-a417-4096-bf61-a5c3f58d125f
“Use PowerPoint to Open or save a Presentation in the OpenDocument Presentation (.odp) Format.” Office. n.d. support.office.com/en-us/article/Use-PowerPoint-to-open-or-save-a-presentation-in-the-OpenDocument-Presentation-odp-format-e32d52a1-a793-49a3-aa2a-6bb1420fab60

How to Align Slide Objects in PowerPoint 2013

Each slide has its own elements, such as text, charts, images, and shapes—all easy to arrange in PowerPoint. A clean, even layout leaves space that lets the eyes focus on more important slide objects. Simply aligning them with each other provides a great deal of order and sophistication into any layout.

We’ve already learned how to group slide objects to help you rearrange many objects in one go. This enables you to move an entire selection of objects, but you might find it inconvenient having to constantly group and ungroup them to access each element separately.

The ability to align objects is especially vital for comprehensive decks that may contain sales figures, which can end up with lots of elements on screen. There are also several ways you can align your objects so you can speed up your process.

We’ll focus on aligning different objects on your slide deck to save you time in managing your own slide workspace.

Align Slide Objects in PowerPoint 2013

In PowerPoint, there are guides that help you adjust your spacing and keep objects lined up. Luckily, you can simply drag an object around, and a floating guide helps you snap objects in place. The temporary guide usually shows up as an orange dotted line.

Screenshots1-01

This is an already helpful feature in itself. Here’s how you can align objects en masse while still retaining individual control of each element:

1. Select what particular object on the slide you wish to arrange. If you want to select several objects at the same time, hold down Shift and then click on the slide objects.

Screenshots2-01

If you want to align multiple objects, click on an empty slide corner and drag your mouse around the chosen items to select each of them. To make sure you don’t leave any object unselected, you can also use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+A.

2. Click on the Drawing Tools Format tab that will appear once you select the item or items.

Screenshots3-01

3. Select the Align dropdown menu in the Arrange group and then choose one from the six selections: Align Left, Align Center, Align Right, Align Top, Align Middle, and Align Bottom.

Screenshots4-01

4. You’ll notice that the slide objects selected will be aligned according to your choice.

Screenshots5-01

Specific Alignments

There are other align options, namely Distribute Horizontally, Distribute Vertically, Align to Slide, and Align Selected Objects.

Your slide objects will line up horizontally or vertically as the command implies. However, these alignment behaviors will be different if you pick Align to Slide or Align Selected Objects. When you select the former, all the scattered objects outside the slide area will be distributed within the slide area. As a further example, if you select all your images to Align Center, all the slide objects will be located at the center of the slide.

Choose Align Selected Objects and Align Center and all your slide objects will line up but not at the center of the slide area or within the slide limits.

Control where you want your slide objects to be with the help of the Align function.

Get Organized

You may be thinking that aligning objects is a simple task. It’s indeed simple and easy! PowerPoint just goes the extra mile to make sure that your slide elements are aligned according to your exact needs. Whether you’re working on a deck that requires detailed content, such as graphs, tables, and charts, using this feature can help you accomplish your task with ease.

The Align PowerPoint feature can help you polish your presentation into a more organized and professional-looking layout, keeping you from placing each element randomly and untidily.

To deliver a more dynamic and engaging PowerPoint presentation, SlideGenius experts can assist you and offer you a free quote!

 

References:

Reynolds, Garr. Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery. Berkeley, CA: New Riders Pub., 2008.
“Align or arrange a picture, shape, text box, SmartArt graphic, or WordArt.” Office, n.d. support.office.com/en-us/article/Align-or-arrange-a-picture-shape-text-box-SmartArt-graphic-or-WordArt-bfd91078-2078-4b35-8672-f6270690b3b8
“PowerPoint 2013: Arranging Objects.” GCFLearnFree.org. n.d. www.gcflearnfree.org/powerpoint2013/19

How to Optimize and Embed Audio in PowerPoint 2013

Emailing a PowerPoint presentation isn’t as simple as it seems. You need to consider if your file is compressed enough for easy e-mail attachment.

There are other important factors to consider. You can’t be there to supervise how your deck is to be viewed, and your deck will be shown on a different computer. There may also be some formatting or compatibility issues you won’t detect.

Issues with audio playback failure and unmanageable audio file size are some of the common problems that viewers and presenters face. Address this common problem with a simple solution. Embed your audio clips and optimize your audio to save yourself the hassle.

Here’s why embedding can assist your PowerPoint:

What about Embedding?

In previous versions of PowerPoint, you had the choice between linking and embedding your audio. The latter is more appropriate for storing audio clips within your presentation. Linking requires access to files on your hard drive. If the recipient of your presentation has no copy of the linked audio, it will be flagged as missing, and the music won’t play.

That’s why it’s recommended to embed sounds into your PowerPoint file. By default, only .wav files under 100KB each can be embedded.

If you’re planning to increase the size of the embedded sound, a maximum of 50MB is acceptable—but it may noticeably slow your presentation down.

In PowerPoint 2013, there’s no clear limit to how much audio you can embed in a deck. Your main concern is how to send your file once it exceeds your e-mail attachment limitation. For example, Google has a 25MB file limit for email attachments.

Google drive 25mb attachment capacityIt might be inconvenient for your recipient if you redirect them to Google Drive to download your file. Since uploading or downloading large files might take longer, you need to keep your PowerPoint file under a manageable size so that your recipient will get your file without any problem.

How Embedding Works

This tutorial uses the Windows 10 operating system. Let’s embed audio in PowerPoint 2013 by first making sure you have your speakers or headphones plugged in. Without a way to listen to sound, you’ll get an error message that will prevent you from inserting audio:

How embedding works: Embed audio in PowerPoint 2013Once you’ve plugged in your headphones or speakers, the program will now allow you to insert an audio file.

SlideGenius Tip:
Pay attention to what View you’re using. You won’t be able to insert audio from the Slide Sorter View, Notes Page View, Reading View, Handout Master View, and Notes Master View. Let’s use Normal View for this tutorial.

1. Go to the Insert.

Embed audio in PowerPoint 2013: Insert2. Click on the Audio icon under the Media group at the far right.

Embed audio in PowerPoint 2013: insert audio3. A dropdown menu will reveal two options. Choose “Audio on my PC…”.

Embed audio in PowerPoint 2013: insert audio on my pc4. A window called Insert Audio will appear. Choose the audio file you want to embed.

Embed audio in PowerPoint 2013: select audio filePowerPoint 2013 can embed audio files with the following extensions: (AIFF Audio file) .aiff, (AU Audio file) .au, (MIDI file) .mid or .midi, (MP3 Audio file) .mp3, (Windows Audio file) .wav, and (Windows Media Audio file) .wma. Only versions of PowerPoint 2013 and later can support (Advanced Audio Coding – MPEG-4 Audio file) .m4a and .mp4. The Microsoft Office page provides these details and more.

5. Once you’ve made your choice, click Insert in the lower right corner of the window.

Embed audio in PowerPoint 20136. Your audio file will now appear on your slide with a sound icon.

Embed audio in PowerPoint 2013: audo iconOptimize your Audio File

This version of PowerPoint has improved the use of audio in presentations. It now has two new features: optimization and compression.

Because embedded audios can now be optimized, files can be smaller using the Advanced Audio Coding technique. This leaves you free from worrying about audio quality.

To optimize audio clips, click on the File menu and go to the Info page, then select Optimize Compatibility in the Optimize Media Compatibility group. If this option can’t be found, the audio has either already been optimized or can’t be optimized for whatever reason.

Embed audio in PowerPoint 2013: optimize media compatibilityYour clips can also be compressed to reduce your deck’s file size. Click on the File menu and go to Info. Under the Media Size and Performance group, click on Compress Media. There are three quality options: Presentation Quality, Internet Quality, and Low Quality.

Embed audio in PowerPoint 2013: media size and performanceJust be aware that the more you compress a file, the more its quality gets reduced.

Other Methods of Embedding Audio Files

Click the Audio icon from the Media group under the Insert tab. Select “Record Audio…” from the list. A small recording menu named Record Sound will appear.

Embed audio in PowerPoint 2013: record audioPress the red button to start recording, and the blue square when you’re finished. A sound icon will appear on the slide with recorded audio.

Embed audio in PowerPoint 2013: recorded soundConclusion

Sharing and uploading presentations online can be less of a chore with our tips on embedding and optimizing your file.

Similar to live speeches, you may also encounter unexpected technical problems that can undermine your credibility. Sidestep the audio playback issues by embedding them straight into your PowerPoint file.

 

References:

Lipera, Roger. “Working with Sound in PowerPoint 2013.” Interactive Media Center. January 2014. titus.ulib.albany.edu/imc/pdf/WorkingWithSoundinPowerPoint2013.pdf
“Add Audio to Your Presentation.” Office. n.d. support.office.com/en-US/article/Add-audio-to-your-presentation-c3b2a9fd-2547-41d9-9182-3dfaa58f1316
“Compress the Media Files in Your Presentation.” Office. n.d. support.office.com/en-us/article/Compress-the-media-files-in-your-presentation-f0927964-25f3-460c-ac42-c6cc3308604c
“Video and Audio File Formats Supported in PowerPoint.” Office. n.d. support.office.com/en-US/article/Video-and-audio-file-formats-supported-in-PowerPoint-d8b12450-26db-4c7b-a5c1-593d3418fb59
“PowerPoint 2013: Improved Audio and Video Options.” TEL@Tees. February 3, 2015. blogs.tees.ac.uk/teltees/2015/02/03/powerpoint-2013-improved-audio-and-video-options

 

Back to Basics: Making the Most of PowerPoint Gradients

If you’re still starting out with PowerPoint, it’s important to explore the program’s different features. Before you can go to the presentation tool’s more advanced options, however, you’ll need to figure out its basic components first.

One of these primary elements is the gradient tool. You don’t need to stick to solid colors all the time. This PowerPoint tool can give a plain slide background or shape some depth and shading, making it more realistic. However, be careful not to overdo it to avoid making your deck look clunky and cluttered. Opt for a cleaner PowerPoint with just the right design.

Learn to use gradients strategically in creating effective shading techniques on a professional deck:

Choosing the Right Color Combination

A gradient is the combination of two or more colors. These colors bleed into each other and overlap, but both are always visible.

Earlier versions of PowerPoint provide built-in gradient fills with their own color combination, but PowerPoint 2010 onward has its preset gradient fills for one color with light and dark variations. You can customize these later on to your preference. This includes adding more colors to your gradient.

Choosing an appropriate color combination is necessary in making hues complement each other. For shading purposes, it’s better to use analogous color schemes or similar color temperatures. As an example, using only warm or cool colors on your gradient will give the illusion of seamless color transition.

Using Preset Gradients

Built-in gradients are the simplest to use and may be preferable for first-time users of PowerPoint. To apply this gradient to shapes, do the following steps: Select the shape you’ll be applying the gradient to. A Format tab will appear in your toolbar.

format tab

Under the Shape Styles group, select Shape Fill > Gradient.

Supporting Image 02 - Shape Fill

Choose from any of the variations available. There are two selections for any solid color in the gradient: Light and dark.

Light variations are your original color mixed with white. On the other hand, its dark counterpart is also your original color with black.

To go to the Gradient option for your slide background, just right click the slide you want to apply the gradient to, and select Format Background.

Supporting Image 03 - Format Background

From there, follow the same set of instructions as applying gradients to shapes.

Customizing Gradients

If you aren’t satisfied with the available gradient choices, you’re free to customize your gradients.

Click on the More Gradients option below the gradient variations.Supporting Image 04 - More Gradients

Here you can choose the Type of gradient you want. It can be radial, rectangular, linear, or path.

You can also pick the Direction you want your colors to take.

Making use of Gradient Stops will let you control how much of each shade blends with the rest.

Supporting Image 05 - Gradient Stops

To change the color of a specific shade, select a gradient stop and change it on the color picker.

Other aspects of your selected gradient stop that you can change include its Position, Transparency, and Brightness.

Experiment with these options until you achieve your desired gradient.

Conclusion

Gradients may be a basic PowerPoint feature, but using it in the right way can still transform your deck into something understandable and easy on the eyes.

Make sure you select the right color combination. This can evoke the right moods for your pitch and achieve an effect that leverages rather than detracts your design.

If you want to familiarize yourself with the basics of PowerPoint gradients, start with preset gradients. Depending on what you want to do with your shape or slide background, choose between light or dark variations of your solid color fill. Customize your gradient and play around with the amount, type, and direction of your colors to add depth and shading. Using the correct color combinations can highlight your brand to make it more distinct and memorable.

Need help with your deck design? Contact our SlideGenius experts today for a free quote!

References

“Add a Gradient Fill to a Shape.” Office Support. www.support.office.com/en-us/article/Add-a-gradient-fill-to-a-shape-11cf6392-723c-4be8-840a-b2dab4b2ba3e
“Color Harmonies.” Tiger Color. www.tigercolor.com/color-lab/color-theory/color-harmonies.htm

Featured Image: “Convergence (Explored!)” by Mohammed Moosa on flickr.com

 

Converting Presentations into Videos in PowerPoint 2013

Converting PowerPoint presentations into videos is a great way to give your speech extra engaging power. Since most people are wired to watching videos, turning your deck into another multimedia format can make your audience completely consume your content.

One of the greatest perks of exporting a presentation as a movie is that you can play videos on both mobile phones and PCs. Presentation files, on the other hand, require Microsoft PowerPoint when viewing or editing a file.

Here’s a quick tutorial on exporting your presentation into a video with PowerPoint 2013:

1. Open the PowerPoint presentation that you want to turn into a video.

PowerPoint 2013 Video: 2. In the upper-left corner of the screen, click on File.

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: Open File3. In the File menu, click on Export.

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: click Export4. Choose Create a Video.

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: Click Create Video5. The Create a Video dialog box will appear, showing two drop-down lists and a time length box.

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: Create video6. The first drop-down menu, labeled Presentation Quality, gives you three different quality options for your exported video.

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: Presentation qualityThe three Presentation Quality options are:

a. Presentation Quality

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: presentation qualityThis has the largest file size, resulting in the highest quality. If you want an HD-quality video with high-end animation, we recommend choosing this one. Your video will be exported at a resolution of 1920px x 1080px.

b. Internet Quality

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: internet qualityThis will result in a medium-sized video, with a moderate quality. Your video will be exported at a resolution of 1280px x 720px.

c. Low Quality

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: low qualityThis will give you the smallest file size, but also the lowest quality. Your video will be exported at a resolution of 852px by 480px.

The second drop-down box allows you to record timings and narrations for each slide. You can even record your own voice for your presentation’s narration.

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: ExportIt contains the following options:

a. Don’t Use Recorded Timings and Narrations

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: Con't use recorded timings and narrationChoose this if you want each slide to stay onscreen for the same amount of time. The default time is 5 seconds.

If you want to change how long each slide will appear, you can adjust the number of seconds in the option labeled Seconds spent on each slide.

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: Click on the up arrow to increase it per second or click on the down arrow to decrease it. Otherwise, just click inside the text box and type how many seconds you want each slide to stay onscreen.

Take note that this option will remove any and all narrations you’ve recorded for this deck.

b. Use Recorded Timings and Narrations

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: use recorded timings and narrationsChoose Record Timings and Narrations if you’d like to record narrations or set each slide to stay onscreen for different amounts of time.

7. Once you’re done with these settings, click the Create Video.

PowerPoint will start converting your presentation into a video file.

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: convert8. When it’s done, the Save As window will appear.

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: save as9. In the File name text box, type the name of your converted video.

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: file name10. When you’re done, click Save.

PowerPoint 2013 Video Tutorial: save

That’s it! Enjoy your PowerPoint video file!

Uploading your PowerPoint file as a video ensures an audience by allowing you and other people to share and watch the video in an instant. Try this video conversion trick to make your work – and your life – easier!

Reference

“How to Save or Convert a PowerPoint Presentation to a Video.” How-To-Geek. n.d. www.howtogeek.com/214947/how-to-save-or-convert-a-powerpoint-presentation-to-a-video

Recover Your Unsaved File in PowerPoint 2013

Unsaved work can happen for a number of reasons. It can happen when there’s a power failure or a system crash, or for whatever reason, maybe you just forgot to hit “Save.”

Don’t worry. Recovering an unsaved file is possible in PowerPoint. In fact, there’s more than one way to recover it. These features are enabled by default, so you’re guaranteed to get your file back.

Be warned that it’s generally not recommended to change these settings because you’ll never know when you need to save unsaved work again.

This guide will point you to where an unsaved file usually goes and what to do to recover it.

Unsaved Files

For owners of Microsoft Office 2010 and higher, recovering an unsaved file is made even easier. However, for users that have the older version of Microsoft Office, refer to this link.

This tutorial will be using PowerPoint 2013, meaning we can access the option also known as AutoRecover.

1. Go to the ribbon and click on File.

recover your unsaved file in PowerPoint 2013: Autorecover

2. In the second column that displays Recent Presentations, scroll down to the bottom and you’ll see a button that reads Recover Unsaved Presentations.

recover your unsaved file in PowerPoint 2013: recover unsave powerpoint

The files in this folder are only stored temporarily, so save your recovered file properly once you find it. Temporary files are deleted automatically from the system. Do not rely on recovery methods to save your work.

3. A dialog box labelled “Open” will appear which will contain your unsaved file.

recover your unsaved file in PowerPoint 2013: label

Click on the address bar as highlighted in the image. This will show the filepath, displaying the exact location of your file.

Copy and paste the filepath to Windows Explorer: C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Office\UnsavedFiles

Don’t forget to replace <username> with yours when copying the filepath from this article:

You can retrieve an unsaved presentation using this method with ease.

Interrupted Changes

This next method is suitable when your changes were interrupted and you wish to restore the changes you made in your work.

1. Go to the ribbon and click on File> Options.

recover your unsaved file in PowerPoint 2013: interruptive changes

2. A dialog box called “PowerPoint Options” will appear. Go to Save and see if the boxes are checked ☑ in the highlighted image. If yes, then you may proceed to the next step.

recover your unsaved file in PowerPoint 2013

These options need to be present to restore your file’s unsaved changes. You won’t be able to recover your file’s previous state when these aren’t checked.

3. Copy the filepath located in the box beside AutoRecover file location. The file can be directly accessed by pasting the filepath in Windows Explorer.

recover your unsaved file in PowerPoint 2013: autorecover file location

Since this tutorial uses PowerPoint 2013 and runs on Windows 8, the filepath looks like this:

C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Office\UnsavedFiles

This filepath will lead you directly to your file. Save this as a separate PowerPoint file and pick up the changes from where you left off.

A Few More Pointers

Avoid relying too much on the recovery functions to save your work because they’re only hosted temporarily in their respective folders. If you leave them there, you’ll never be able to retrieve them after a certain period of time has passed. Always remember to save your files outside of these temporary file folders.

You also don’t want to risk damaging or corrupting your presentation save-states by changing the save settings in PowerPoint. It can be tempting to tweak the settings, but only advanced users should make these changes. In fact, changing these settings is highly discouraged because file recovery is placed there by default for good measure.

Save yourself from any potential headaches in the future and save your files properly.

 

Reference

“Recovery of MS PowerPoint Content from Temp Files.” officerecovery.com. www.office-recovery.com/powerpoint.asp

2 Easy Ways to Avoid Missing Fonts in PowerPoint 2013

Launching a presentation that fails to display your font choices can be disappointing. Not only can this scenario be completely avoided with a few simple checks, but it’s also a waste of time invested in picking a set of fonts that match your pitch.

The problem happens when the fonts you used are unavailable on the computer you’re using for your presentation. Here are two easy ways to help you display custom fonts in your deck:

I. Embed Fonts

Embed fonts in PowerPoint first to guarantee font compatibility when transferring your deck to another computer. Follow these steps so that your fonts won’t go missing during a presentation:

1. Click the File tab on the ribbon. You’ll be taken to the Backstage view.

how to embed fonts in powerpoint 2013

2. Click on Options at the bottom of the vertical ribbon.

how to embed fonts in powerpoint 2013 steps

3. A window called PowerPoint Options will appear. Click on Save in the left column.

how to embed fonts in powerpoint 2013

4. Scroll down further and check the box for Embed fonts in the file under the heading that says Preserve fidelity when sharing this presentation.

5. Select Embed only the characters used in the presentation (best for reducing file size).

how to embed fonts in powerpoint 2013: embed only

6. Click OK.

how to embed fonts in powerpoint 2013: click ok

Your custom fonts should now be embedded within the presentation. This method eliminates the need of having to install your custom fonts to every computer that will view the presentation.

II. Save as PDF

When you’re pressed for time, saving your presentation as PDF is also a great alternative. It’s ideal for maintaining the appearance of fixed slide layout and fonts. However, this format will be unable to play animations, so do take note if your pitch needs to be viewed with dynamic animation.

1. Click on the File tab, select Export, then choose Create PDF/XPS Document.

how to embed fonts in powerpoint 2013: create as pdf

2. Click on Create PDF/XPS.

how to embed fonts in powerpoint 2013: create as pdf / xps

3. A confirmation window will appear. Put a check next to Open file after publishing, below Save as type.

how to embed fonts in powerpoint 2013: open file after publishing

4. Enable Standard (publishing online and printing).

how to embed fonts in powerpoint 2013: standard publishing

5. Give a file name for your presentation, then click Publish in the lower right corner.

how to embed fonts in powerpoint 2013: click publish

Have a Backup Plan

Using great font combinations for your PowerPoint slides can give your presentation maximum readability. There’s also the added bonus of making your deck stand out from a sea of boring, default font types with a custom font unique to your presentation.

That’s why instances like missing fonts and changes in font formats may put a dent on your well-designed deck. This doesn’t have to happen. Embed your fonts within PowerPoint 2013 to ensure that your custom fonts appear exactly as you want them to during your pitch. You also have the option to save your file as a PDF when you’re in a pinch. Although you’ll preserve the appearance of your slides, a PDF file can’t play any animations that you’ve set in each slide.

Choose among these two easy options so that your fonts won’t disappear when you have a big presentation coming up.

 

References

“How to embed fonts in PowerPoint.” Microsoft. n.d. www.support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/826832
“Troubleshoot font problems.” PPTools. n.d. www.pptfaq.com/FAQ00402_Troubleshoot_font_problems.htm

How to Add Narration to PowerPoint 2013

Every opportunity needs to be maximized to make a sale. This includes sending a presentation file to clients outside the conference room.

Sound effects and music aren’t the only audio files you can add to your deck. By adding a narration to your PowerPoint 2013 and synchronizing your voice with your slides, you can make it feel like you’re right there discussing your idea. This connects with your audience further since you explicitly tell the story instead of them reading the deck by themselves.

To provide a comprehensive deck that’s easy to understand, add a narration as the final touch to your self-running presentation.

We’ll cover the steps on how you can lay out the narration for your deck. First, make sure that you have a microphone available so that you’ll be able to record yourself.

Set Up for Recording

With a microphone ready, open up PowerPoint 2013 and load up your prepared presentation.

1. Go to the Slide Show tab at the ribbon. In the Set Up group, click on the Record Slide Show dropdown menu.

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2. Two options will appear: Start Recording from Beginning and Start Recording from Current Slide.

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3. By clicking either of these selections, a dialog box named Record Slide Show will appear with recording options.

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4. Tick the box that says Slide and Animations Timing if you want to control slide timings with your recording further. We’ll need to check the Narrations, Ink and Laser Pointer box so we can directly record on each slide.

Checking this box also means that you can use the ink and laser pointer tools as well for your recording if your version of PowerPoint supports it and if these tools are connected.

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5. You can start recording at once by pressing the Record Slide Show icon. Alternatively, you can choose to record on a different slide by clicking the Record Slide Show dropdown menu and selecting Start Recording from Beginning or Start Recording from Current Slide.

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The Recording Menu

Your slide show will play in full screen as recording begins. On the upper left corner of the screen, you’ll see the small Recording menu.

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Drag it around the screen if you prefer it be elsewhere. You can make the menu smaller, but you won’t be able to make it stretch bigger.

There are three buttons: the straight arrow is the Next button, the pause icon is Pause Recording, and the curved arrow is Repeat. There are also two sets of timers.

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The timer in the middle displays the recording length of the current slide while the timer in the right displays the total recording time of your narration. Let’s take a look at three buttons you need to use here:

1. Next

Clicking this automatically records the audio for the next slide in your presentation. Alternately, simply clicking on the slide will stop and save your current recording. This lets you begin a new one in the next slide.

2. Pause

You can pause and come back where you left off in your current recording using this button. Instead of redoing your entire narration, you just need to refer back to your notes and continue recording.

Just exit your current recording session, manually select the slide and re-record it later with the Start Recording from Current Slide option. This can be found in the Record Slide Show dropdown menu in the Slide Show tab.

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3. Repeat

Retake your entire recording for a slide by clicking on this. The Repeat button does not play back your audio but deletes your previous recording so that you can input a new one. After recording, the slide show will close and return to the Normal View of your presentation.

A sound icon will appear on the lower right corner of every slide where you’ve recorded your audio. Preview your recorded narration by clicking these to show the playback settings. The icon won’t be visible during slide show mode.

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Bring Your Slides to Life

For the moments where you can’t be physically there to give your presentation, you won’t have the chance to answer inquires and clarify information. A narration is crucial to create a comprehensive and interactive presentation.

A narrated deck is even more important especially when you’re uploading it online, where you won’t be around to explain things. Once your deck has been uploaded, you may not always be able to go back and make changes, so don’t miss out on your last chance to make sure that your presentation gets its message across.

 

References

“Record Your Slide Show in PowerPoint.” Office Support. n.d. www.support.office.com/en-us/article/Record-your-slide-show-in-PowerPoint-9d136e4a-9717-49ad-876e-77aeca9c17eb
“Using the PowerPoint Workspace.” Office Support. n.d. www.support.office.com/en-US/article/Using-the-PowerPoint-workspace-8C6700CF-67C6-4275-A86B-AA87D31C9724

Protect Your Slides in PowerPoint 2013

Today, anybody can easily access and share millions of presentations online, whether for personal or commercial use. This is great if you want your file to be shared everywhere, but this isn’t so great when you’re aiming to keep your deck confidential. If you want to keep your PowerPoint presentation solely your intellectual property, you need to set your file’s privacy and viewing permissions properly.

Did you know that anyone can just copy or edit your content whenever they have access to your file? Luckily, this can be avoided with PowerPoint 2013’s file security options, allowing you to protect your slides for good. Here are several ways to protect your presentation from unauthorized access and unwanted changes:

1. Click on the File tab on the ribbon. This leads you to the Backstage View window.

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2. While in the Backstage View, click on Info in the menu.

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3. Choose Protect Presentation. This will reveal three options you can choose from:

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a. Mark as Final: Marking a presentation as final gives you a read-only copy of your PowerPoint. A dialog box will prompt you to accept the changes.

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When you try to open a PowerPoint file marked as final, a thin yellow ribbon will appear with a warning. Next to this is a button that says Edit Anyway. Clicking on this button will make the file editable again.

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b. Encrypt with Password: Click this if you want to set a secure password for your presentation. A dialog box will prompt you to set a password for your file. Take note that the program cannot recover lost passwords.

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c. Digital Signature: Adding a digital signature establishes your identity and assures people viewing the file that the presentation is your own. To create a digital signature, you need to send the following to Microsoft:

a. Signing certificate and a public key
b. Certificate Authority

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In Short: It’s Easy to Protect Your PowerPoint

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Protecting your PowerPoint file keeps your presentation from being edited or viewed by random individuals. If your deck contains confidential or sensitive information, don’t take any risks. Use any of the three options to give yourself some peace of mind and maintain your creative ownership.

Just one thing: Remember your passwords when you choose to encrypt your PowerPoint files. The program cannot retrieve the password when you lose or forget the password you set for it.

A digital signature makes your work appear more authentic and is an excellent way for you to leave your stamp of ownership on your file. The requirements for a digital signature will take more time and effort on your part, but it will be worth it for the extra security it gives.

 

References

Bajaj, Geetesh. “PowerPoint 2013 Tutorials – File Menu and Backstage View.” Indezine. January 9, 2013. www.indezine.com/products/powerpoint/learn/interface/file-menu-backstage-view-ppt2013.html
“Add or Remove Protection in Your Document, Workbook, or Presentation.” n.d. Office Support. www.support.office.com/en-us/article/Add-or-remove-protection-in-your-document-workbook-or-presentation-05084cc3-300d-4c1a-8416-38d3e37d6826#__toc311701333
“Digital Signatures and Certificates.” Office Support. n.d. www.support.office.com/en-us/article/Digital-signatures-and-certificates-8186cd15-e7ac-4a16-8597-22bd163e8e96
“Protecting Your Presentation.” GCF LearnFree. n.d. www.gcflearnfree.org/powerpoint2013/28.2