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8 Ways Eye Contact Can Make or Break Your Presentation

“When you are first introduced to people, looking them in the eye or avoiding their gaze will send an instant message,” says an article published in Research Digest titled. Initiating eye connection is a universal premise in public speaking—it ignites a connection between the speaker and the audience. It is the key to coalescing your core message and excellent delivery.
As a presenter, your main goal is to clearly convey a message to your spectators. Whether your presentation tackles business proposals, client projects, or branding strategies, your sole purpose is to turn spectators into customers and engage clients for investments. To do this, you must delve deep into details and begin with an indispensable speaking mantra: eye contact.

Eye Contact During a Presentation

The eyes are the windows to one’s soul. It bears the integrity of your intentions and the authenticity of the subliminal messages you cascade. In hindsight, eye contact establishes an invitation to mentally connect with another person. As a speaker, you must meet your audience’s gaze to show a need to engage while presenting.
Furthermore, establishing eye contact helps you retain your composure while speaking. As you roam your eyes erratically, more visual signals are sent to your brain, which slows it down. Keep in mind that your stance substantiates your authority as a speaker. Stuttering, being lost in thought, and stopping mid-sentence are major no-no’s. These cases devalue your identity as a presenter.

Strengthening the Connection

Calling it “eye contact” can just mean “meeting of the eye” rather than having a genuine connection. To appear warmer, avoid making a superficial look, and initiate an “eye connection” instead. Eye connection means spending more time enthralling each person in the room as if you’re personally talking to them.
By establishing a brief but engaging connection, your spectators would perceive intentionality as you speak. You’d also avoid sounding too technical thus creating a conversational and engaging atmosphere.
Check the infographic below to learn the other pros and cons of eye contact during presentations.

 

Resources:

Wyeth, Sims. “10 Reasons Eye Contact Is Everything in Public Speaking.” Inc. June 18, 2014. www.inc.com/sims-wyeth/10-reasons-why-eye-contact-can-change-peoples-perception-of-you.html
Jarett, Christian. “The Psychology of Eye Contact, Digested.” Research Digest. November 28, 2016. digest.bps.org.uk/2016/11/28/the-psychology-of-eye-contact-digested
“Eye Contact During a Presentation.” Syntaxis. n.d. www.syntaxis.com/eye-contact-during-a-presentation

Boosting Productivity with the Help of Nature

Do you find a certain monotony in your professional life wherein you feel cooped up in a little concrete square during work hours? Are you distracted by the many different sights, sounds, and miscellaneous goings-on in the office? Is this dip, if not crash, in productivity immensely affecting your performance? Then perhaps you need a bit—or a lot—of nature.
It’s a known fact that spending time outdoors can be beneficial to your health. Not only can you soak up vitamin D from the sun, but nature also regulates your mood and ultimately makes you feel freer. Thus, you become less susceptible to anemia, growing happier and more positive in general.
How does that fare for an entrepreneur? The general health benefits of taking a few hours of rest in nature’s glory far outweigh the pros of staying in an indoor office. You may want to consider setting aside time to step outside and enjoy the greenery before returning to work on your output.

Correlation of Productivity and Nature

Years of research back up how the environment affects productivity. In fact, a team of German researchers reported that even just seeing green rectangles for two seconds is enough to improve creativity. Talk about extreme.
On the other hand, however, it may not be feasible for you to work outside the office. Perhaps it’s because you have sensitive data you must keep secure. In that case, how about bringing the outdoors indoors? Investing in the general look and atmosphere of your work environment can be just as beneficial. Small adjustments like adding potted plants in the office can do wonders to your productivity. The same goes with the repainting of your walls. It’s a good thing the Pantone color of 2017 is Greenery because it can help boost creativity in the workplace.
There are other ways to let nature help you. Check the following infographic from SlideGenius to maximize your office efforts with nature’s guiding hand.
 

 

Resources:

Burkeman, Oliver. “Nature and Nurture.” The Guardian. March 16, 2013. www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/mar/16/this-column-change-life-nature-nurture
Wise, Abigail. “Here’s Proof Going Outside Makes You Healthier.” Huffington Post. June 22, 2014. www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/22/how-the-outdoors-make-you_n_5508964.html