Slidegenius, Inc.

Designing Presentations for Accessibility

What defines “good” presentation design? From the style of the graphics to the cohesiveness of the content, every element should come together to help deliver a clear message. Whether you’re pitching a groundbreaking product to a room of investors, or simply providing your team with a weekly update, you want your audience to walk away with clear, actionable knowledge.  

However, something many creators neglect with presentation design is the element of accessibility. It’s simply natural for most people to create a presentation based on their own perceptions and point-of-view. But the reality is, that there’s a chance that someone in their audience has a disability that limits their ability to effectively understand the presentation. This reality of understanding and adapting to the disabilities of others is where Accessible Design comes into play. It’s what ensures that your presentation is understood and enjoyed by the widest possible audience. 

In this article, we will dive into the impact of Accessible Design and how it can give your entire audience the clarity and knowledge they need.  

What is Accessible Design?  

Accessible Design is centered on being sensitive to the disabilities of others and creating designs that can be understood by all. In 2018, the CDC stated that 1 in 4 US adults live with some form of disability. The following are among the most common disabilities: 

Color Blindness – According to Colour Blindness Awareness, roughly 1 in 12 men and 1 in 200 women live with color vision deficiency. This typically refers to having difficulty in distinguishing red and green colors effectively from one another. In more severe cases, a person’s vision is monochromatic. Globally, there are approximately 300 million people with some degree of color blindness.  

Dyslexia – Considered the most common learning disability, roughly 10% of the population has dyslexia. It affects one’s ability to effectively relate speech with letters and words, making it hard to learn through reading.  

ADHD – Roughly 60% of children diagnosed with ADHD grow into adulthood still with ADHD. Those with the disorder often have trouble focusing their attention and organizing their thoughts. People with ADHD often struggle to retain information when they are bombarded by too much content.  

Photosensitive epilepsy – 3.4 million people in America alone suffer from epilepsy, with sudden, sometimes unpredictable seizures. Many of these people are highly sensitive to flashing lights or colors, leading to dangerous falls or traumatic episodes.  

How it Works 

As a designer, it’s your job to make sure that, no matter who’s in your audience, your message is clear and delivered responsibly. But the key to Accessible Design is actually a good cornerstone of creative work in general: the simpler, the better.  

Like any art form, a truly beautiful presentation often benefits from an understanding of minimalism. “Less is more,” as the saying goes. By carefully curating your content, you allow your audience to focus on the information that matters. This is significant for those with ADHD because fewer elements mean fewer possible distractions. Remember: a presentation is a visual medium, not a novel or article. Often, the hardest question is: “what should I not include?” 

The minimalist philosophy also applies to designing presentations for those with color blindness. A presentation with a color palette limited to 2-3 simple colors can make for both a stylish and accessible design. This would rely on effectively utilizing white spaces to contrast the colors, making elements pop and easily distinguishable. 

Dyslexia, on the other hand, takes a bit more finesse to manage. Because people with dyslexia struggle with recognizing the distinct shapes of letters, consider your choice of fonts carefully. Using simple sans serif fonts like Arial or Verdana increases readability, without compromising design aesthetics. Additionally, keeping your font large makes it easier to read all the text on screen overall. 

Making design accessible for all.

Why Accessibility Matters  

The value of accessibility is similar to how many buildings are made to have wheelchair access. These facilities allow individuals who use wheelchairs to enter buildings with ease. Discussions are much more valuable when the whole room can share the same knowledge. Being able to generate a great and fruitful discussion is the mark of delivering a killer presentation.

Finally, by focusing on minimalism and streamlining your content, there’s a good chance that you’ve improved your design overall!  

Design is evolving at a rate that makes it easy to get caught up in so many new trends and ideas. However, the purpose of practicing Accessible Design is to remind ourselves that there are people out there who live with disabilities. Whether or not a person in your audience has a disability, practicing accessibility is a sign of good faith that your presentation is inclusive of everyone.  

Presentations on the Move: The Power of Animation in PowerPoint

Humans are naturally visual beings. Going as far back as the era of cave paintings, humans have always used visuals to communicate. Luckily today, we have more tools at our disposal than just soot and stone. With a platform as powerful as PowerPoint, we can create highly visual stories to captivate potential clients, partners, or investors. While there are plenty of ways to design an engaging presentation, one method stands above the rest, and that’s the use of animations.

When someone is presented with static images, they tend to take one look and be done with it. On the other hand, animated graphics effectively dictate the flow of information to the audience. Even small hints of motion will grab a person’s attention, whether it’s text fading into the screen or icons moving in a hypnotic loop.

Let’s break down some ways to use animation and the impact it can have on your next PowerPoint presentation.

Keeping Audiences Engaged  

A key reason for utilizing animation is for engagement purposes. Seasoned presenters and boardroom newbies alike know the hardest part about presenting is maintaining the attention of your audience. It’s incredibly easy for people to lose focus during a presentation when there’s nothing visually exciting to keep them engaged. We’ve all sat through presentations that have lost our attention and seem to drag on for ages. Now that virtual meetings are the norm, people are more likely to have their attention slip from their screens. Keeping people engaged is now more challenging than ever. 

The power of animation within a presentation lies in how it helps control the eyes of your audience. This can lead to plenty of playful opportunities in your design, which in turn keeps them focused on the presentation and ultimately your story. 

For example, instead of simply showcasing bullet points, you can sequentially fade in your points bullet by bullet. While people’s attention may still sometimes drift, the animation will help them jump back into the topic at any time. 

Being Memorable 

Another key goal of every presentation is to leave a lasting impression on your audience. When an audience experiences a presentation with thought-out motion graphics, it instantly becomes a point of interest. Additionally, animation adds more impact and energy to your content because it’s an element of surprise. And we always remember surprises, don’t we?   

When animation is used effectively, audiences can retain up to 95% of the information presented. While on the other hand, audiences will only remember 10% of information when it’s presented as static images and text.  

Ultimately, animation helps make your content stick out in the memory of your audience. A visually engaging presentation will leave them more likely to retain the information you discussed.  

Levels of Animation  

The good thing about animation is that it doesn’t need to be aggressive to be effective. Even just small hints of movement are enough to keep your audience fixed on the screen. 

For example, by adding simple motions like fades and slides to staple elements like text boxes and icons, you instantly inject energy into the presentation.  

However, you can explore more complex levels of animation to elevate your presentation even further. Animating content such as explainers, infographics and data visualizations can significantly raise the visual impact of your presentation. Infographics are already very visually stimulating but imagine adding animation elements that enhance the design and push your presentation over the top.  

To sum up, animation is one of the most versatile tools you can use in PowerPoint. Whether you are pitching to your next big investor or simply communicating with internal teams, animation adds a layer of flair to any presentation. It will help make your presentation stand out and create a greater impact on your business.  

Making Big Statements with Minimalist Design

Minimalist graphic design is timeless. The phrase “less is more” best encapsulates the core philosophy of minimalism, which is to strip down a design to its most essential elements.  

Designs are simplified to avoid unnecessary fluff that may distract audiences from the message. However, there are nuances to understand to effectively utilize minimalist designs.

Now you must be asking, “what makes minimalist designs stand out?” In this article, we will analyze the subtlety of minimalist design and how it applies to PowerPoint presentations. 

Understanding the Essentials 

The key parts of every PowerPoint presentation include: 

  • Graphics – The geometric elements that structure the different sections of a slide. 
  • Content – The text featured throughout the presentation.  
  • Images – The use of photos, illustrations, icons, etc. 
  • Color – The overarching color scheme related to the brand or presentation topic.  
  • Font type – The “tone of voice” in which the text is speaking.  

It becomes a game of balance and moderation with these elements to keep the design as minimal as possible. The amount of text you feature on each slide. By keeping your text minimal, you’re naturally provided with more to work with for graphics. These graphics can then consist of clean and crisp lines to subtly guide the eyes across each slide. It’s crucial to understand how all these different elements interact and complement each other. Balance is the key difference between minimalist design and simply adding black text onto a white background. By doing away with unnecessary clutter, you help your audience sift through the information and grasp the message you are expressing. 

Embracing Negative Space  

One of the defining characteristics of minimalist design is the effective use of negative space. Sometimes called white space, this refers to the empty spaces between the various elements in a design. You can use these spaces to create breathing room for the different elements of your slide. As a result, your audience will naturally have an easier time visually deciphering what are the key points of each slide.

We’ve all seen our fair share of PowerPoint slides filled to the brim with text and images. The common logic in these cases is the fear of the audience missing out on important information. However, it’s actually the lack of negative space that makes it difficult for audiences to quickly decipher what’s important in the slide. An overly packed slide just leaves audiences struggling to filter through the mess.

To give yourself more negative space to work with, you will need to carefully condense your content. Start this process by zoning in on the key points of your presentation. Once you’ve decided on what’s truly essential to your message, single out each of these points into its own slide or section. By boiling down the information to its most essential points, you’re left with significantly less content featured on each slide. The greater negative space in your slides will help create a structure that naturally guides your audience’s attention as you go through the presentation. 

Keeping Things Simple  

Simple designs help audiences to stay focused on your message. That is because humans are very visual beings. Our brains are constantly processing vast amounts of visual data at any moment. When faced with too much content packed into a single slide, your audience will just be subjected to bad a case of information overload.

Simple, minimalist designs are a way of filtering out all unnecessary information and giving audiences all they need to know directly. As the presenter, it’s your mission to effectively deliver your message. Above all, minimalism allows you to focus on and emphasize the key points of your presentation. 

Consider how often people are bombarded by so much information. It’s refreshing to sit through a presentation with content that feels curated and carefully designed. You can maximize the message of each slide by simply focusing on your most essential pieces of information. It does not matter how much you are trying to say, it’s about the quality and intent of what’s being said.  

Are Presentation-Type Posts Getting More Popular on Instagram?

Instagram has become one of the biggest and most diverse platforms for brands to present digital visual content. Between Stories, IGTV, and IG Live, the platform has continuously given users new and exciting ways to express themselves.  

However, in recent years, presentation-type posts have grown in popularity. What started out as a simple, seamless way to upload more content within a single post has transformed into a format that strategically boosts engagement and helps spread relevant information.  

The Numbers Don’t Lie  

According to SocialInsider, carousel-type posts are among the most engaged throughout the entire platform. Below are some key insights from the study: 

  • ~19% of Instagram posts are carousels  
  • Carousels hold a ~1.92% average engagement rate  
  • Posts with both images and videos have the highest average engagement of 2.33%  

The increased potential for engagements is what makes these kinds of posts very valuable. As more users leave comments, brands develop a clearer scope of their audience and how they can further improve their content.

Content with a Purpose  

With greater narrative potential in these carousel posts, there has been a growing trend in utilizing them as a way to tell more relevant stories. 

Similar to the structure of a PowerPoint presentation, the opening image raises a compelling message that further builds upon each succeeding image. 

These PowerPoint-like posts are enabling creators and influencers in spreading highly informative content to wider audiences. 

While posting informative content is not necessarily new to the platform, 2020 saw a boom in these types of posts due to pressing topics like the COVID-19 pandemic, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the US elections. 

Instagram became a space many people utilized to learn more about increasingly relevant topics. It became essential to post carousels to help spread valuable information for people looking for it. Brands saw this as an opportunity to be part of the conversation and to connect with their customers. 

The Rise of Instagram Reels 

Reels are among the newest features of the platform, and it bears many of the same strengths of carousel-type posts. The feature allows users to create 15- to 30-second video clips and style them up with music, filters, and other augmented reality effects. Much like carousels, Reels are highly engaging, diverse in their content, and most importantly, an ideal tool for relevant storytelling.

Building Brands  

Carousels and Reels have become major content focal points across Instagram. Brands and creators started using them in strategic ways to further improve their image and visibility. 

Carousels are unmatched in their ability to incorporate different styles of content within a single post. The flexibility of both carousels and Reels provides greater opportunities for interactive and engaging storytelling. 

From a series of interconnected images and videos to an informative Reel, these presentation-type posts are ideal for engaging people on more narrative-centric content and interactions.

Data Storytelling: Combining Relevant Data with Impactful Design

We live in a data-driven world. Whether you’re a budding social media influencer, startup entrepreneur, or big business expert, data is essential for developing meaningful insights that will positively impact your actions and decision-making.  

But because technology is advancing so quickly, it’s become increasingly difficult to navigate through the immense amounts of data that is available. Even beyond business settings, we are faced with copious amounts of data on the news and social media, but they are not always distilled in ways most people can understand.  

Making data more understandable is the primary goal of proper data visualization and storytelling.  

In a time when data is so abundant, experts must utilize design to transform raw numbers and information into visual narratives capable of deeply connecting with an audience. In this article, we will delve into what makes data storytelling meaningful and effective within today’s landscape.  

Crafting a Narrative Centered on Data  

Data storytelling gives meaning and context to the data you’re expressing. While using simple charts and tables to express data is not a new concept, building a narrative around these visuals adds greater depth and understanding to your message.  

Consider the basic elements of a story’s structure:  

  • Introduction – Establish the core message behind your data to set the narrative in motion.
  • Rising Action – Present the key data points that support the main message of the presentation. 
  • Climax – The culminating piece of information that ties everything together.  
  • Conclusion – The course of action you want your audience to take with information presented.  

Establishing a narrative makes it easier for audiences to naturally follow the points being raised without feeling too overwhelmed by everything that is presented.

Utilizing with the Right Visuals  

People turn to data when they want to learn more about the world and generate deeper insights. Choosing the appropriate visual approach to present key facts can significantly amplify the impact of the data presented. 

Some samples and their usage include: 

  • Line charts – For depicting progression of data over a set amount of time 
  • Pie charts – For expressing the value of various pieces that fit into a whole 
  • Bar charts – For showing clear comparisons between different data categories 
  • Heat maps – For representing data on a geographical scale 

Infographics, on the other hand, are an entirely different beast on their own. These take plenty of effort to create but are easily among the most visually engaging ways of expressing data. As an example, using infographics as social media content extends engagement to wider audiences.  

Embracing the Power of Data Storytelling  

We are visual learners. The importance of and access to data will only continue to grow. With that growth will come an even greater need for skillful data storytelling. Data has proven to be an essential resource for growing businesses and brands. It’s more critical than ever that we learn how to better analyze and express the bigger messages that lie behind the information. By further developing the skills in data storytelling, professionals can significantly expand their abilities to effectively communicate rich insights and start making more impactful actions.  

Are You Using the Full Power of PowerPoint to Tell Your Story?

When it comes down to creating a PowerPoint presentation, most people only scratch the surface of what the program is capable of.  

After all, that’s the beauty of it.  

PowerPoint is packed with features simple enough for anyone to use when preparing a presentation.  

When it comes to showcasing your business, however, using only the basic features can lead to bland slides. Going beyond the surface of PowerPoint will reveal an extensive suite of tools to help make your presentation more effective and visually pleasing.  

With the right skills and know-how, you can maximize the full resources of PowerPoint.  

Here are three great functions that will help make your next presentation stand out: 

Custom Vectors 

Templates are among the basic features built into PowerPoint. From the get-go, the program offers a wide range of templates suitable for different purposes. However, PowerPoint has been around long enough that almost anyone can easily recognize if someone is using one of the built-in templates. On paper, it’s great having the option to choose from these templates. But really, these lack the personal flair to make your presentation stand out. 

On the other hand, PowerPoint comes equipped with tools that allow you to create your own personal templates and designs. From the way you design text boxes to the graphic elements used throughout the presentation, these vectors will greatly influence how your presentation is internalized by audiences. By virtue of presenting designs that are “custom,” you are showing audiences something that’s visually unique to your brand, making it easier for them to remember your presentation. 

Stylized Charts and Tables 

A cardinal sin in presentation design that many people still commit is the act of pasting raw data sheets onto their slides. This is wrong for multiple reasons:  

  1. Raw data is difficult to interpret quickly. 
  1. It’s visually unappealing looking at a page of unfiltered text and numbers. 

What many people don’t realize is that PowerPoint has direct functionality with Excel. You can simply link an Excel sheet within PowerPoint to generate charts and tables using data from the file. You can edit and stylize these tables to your liking with ease. 

Additionally, if you have the time and skills to do so, we recommend designing charts and tables using your own custom vectors. This follows the logic discussed above. Showcasing data using custom vectors will help emphasize key pieces of information, which makes it easier for audiences to absorb and retain your core message.

Slide Animations  

It is often debated whether slide animations are necessary for making an impactful presentation. Many believe animations help make presentations be more visually engaging for audiences. While others consider animations to be distracting and overly complicated. However, the answer is not that black or white. Animation is all about balance and purpose.  

To the naysayers’ point, many presenters overuse and misuse animations. When used correctly, however, animations can emphasize key points of each slide.  

Naturally, movement draws people’s attention. Even the most subtle animations, like fades and lines, can dictate how audiences absorb information. In remote settings, animations can help re-engage the focus of your audience.

When you use its different capabilities cohesively, PowerPoint is among the most powerful tools for expressing messages and narratives. PowerPoint has everything you will ever need to showcase the best points about your business in unique and engaging ways.  

Dealing with Negative Space in Presentation Design 

An often overlooked aspect in presentation design is the use of negative/white space. Anyone can admit to sitting through a presentation with slides filled to the brim with text or images.  

Think back to the many slides you’ve seen that look more like pages of a book. No rhyme or reason behind the slide design. They are merely used as a repository of information that will be talked over during the presentation.  

Slides like that come off as extremely cluttered and unintelligible. But more importantly, they are prime examples of why the proper use of negative space is so important. 

What is Negative Space?  

Negative space refers to areas that are devoid of any sort of design element.  

While, by definition, the word “empty” may sound like it’s a bad thing, there’s purpose behind these spaces. Negative space is what literally defines and organizes the content featured on any given slide. Properly using negative space can greatly improve the visual impact of slides and further elevate the core message.  

Creating Balance in Design  

As mentioned earlier, a common mistake that many people make is to just fill slides to the brim with content. Just blocks of text or a mishmash of images thrown into a single slide.  

Not only do these kinds of slides look visually sloppy, but they can also make things harder for audiences to understand what is being presented. Information overload is a very real concern that presenters should always consider. When there is just too much going on within a single slide, people will be left confused and unsure of what information they should be focusing on.  

By applying the use of more negative space, it forces you to rethink and rebalance the content of your slides. When a slide looks too busy or loaded, consider trimming down the copy further or creating a new slide altogether to move information into.  

This “less is more” approach gives you more breathing room to balance the content of your slides with its overall design. It will come down to a matter of what you are saying, not how much you have to say.  

Guide the Eyes of Your Audience  

If you find yourself staring at a crowded slide, remember this: When everything is being spoken loudly, nothing will be heard.  

Negative space allows you to partition information and guide audiences to your desired message. There’s a greater sense of importance when content is singled out and given the space it needs to shine. When done right, negative space is a great tool for effectively developing a narrative within your presentation.  

Imagine flipping from slide to slide in a quick pace with no speech to guide the presentation. By structuring content using negative space, audiences can identify key information from any given slide.  

Negative space helps you establish a visual roadmap that guides audiences across your presentation. When audiences can keep track of what’s being talked about, it’s easier for presenters to effectively get their point across.  

Engaging Minimalism  

Despite being an “overused” term, minimalism remains a very effective design practice. From both design and copy standpoints, crafting a concise and minimalist presentation has greater potential to be memorable than one that seems to say too much.  

The use of negative space is synonymous with minimalism because it provides structure and emphasis to the featured content. As naturally visual beings, humans are more likely to appreciate imagery that’s elegant and pleasing to look at.  

While it is always tempting to pack slides with as much information as possible, taking a more measured approach is more effective in engaging people’s attention.  

10/20/30: Why the Rule Should Be Used in Presentations

Are you familiar with the 10/20/30 rule? It states that a presentation should have 10 slides, last no more than 20 minutes, and should not have a font sizes less than 30 pt. 

This rule was made due to the gradual decrease of people’s attention spans. Making presentations concise and straightforward will save time while still getting the core message across. 

Let us elaborate.

10 Slides 

It can be quite a challenge to comprehend more than 10 concepts during a meeting. 

The 10/20/30 rule suggests using 10 slides to discuss your core message, and provides the following example flow of topics for investor proposals and venture capitalist presentations:

  • Problem 
  • Your solution 
  • Business model 
  • Underlying magic/technology 
  • Marketing and sales 
  • Competition 
  • Team 
  • Projections and milestones 
  • Status and timeline 
  • Summary and call-to-action 

Remember these if you want to get your point across in a concise and straightforward way. Depending on the type of presentation you’re giving, you can tweak these to fit your purpose, but try to keep your slides to a 10 slide minimum, with a visible flow like the one above.

20 Minutes 

Ideally, a 10-slide presentation would only take 20 minutes to finish. Beyond that and you’ll start losing your audience’s attention. 

Keep your presentations short so you can address questions and other concerns at the end. 

30pt Font Size 

People usually use smaller font sizes to cram chunks of information into their slides. Doing so might distract your audience from listening to you and leave them unable to focus or retain the information you present. They may also question whether you are familiar with your own material. A straightforward presentation will assure the audience that you know the topic well enough to explain it in a way that they will understand, especially if they’re new to the concept. 

Use a larger font and remove the unnecessary details. Remember, your presentation shouldn’t do the talking for you, but instead, be there to guide your audience. 

Use the 10/20/30 rule as a consistent baseline to keep your audience engaged during your next presentation. Working within its boundaries will push you to craft a more refined presentation that focuses purely on the essentials, leaving out any distractions for your audience. It’s important to remember that people naturally have a limit to their attention span. This simple and effective rule is meant to guide you in creating a presentation that fits fully within the peak time of your audience’s attention. It’s at that point when your message is most effective and will lead to a more memorable experience for all.

How To Use Your Brand’s Custom Fonts in PowerPoint Design

Custom fonts evoke emotions, making them an essential tool for defining your brand. Some fonts may portray traditional aesthetics, others a modern taste and can even give communicate grace and elegance. Brands strategically utilize fonts to help visually define their overall identity. Considering fonts can express a distinct “personality” it’s important to choose one that fits well with the brand and message you want to convey.

Often you are conveying your brand message through presentations internally, to customers, or even to potential investors so it is important to consistently use your brand’s font across all platforms. Employing your custom font in your presentations can help revitalize your design and define your brand’s aesthetics through your PowerPoint presentation. 

Using Custom Fonts in PowerPoint 

In order to use your brand’s custom font in your presentation, you’ll need to install it on your computer. Go to Control Panel > Fonts, then drag-and-drop or copy-and-paste the fonts into the Fonts Manager. Make sure the files are unzipped before you do. 

Avoiding Your Custom Font Being Replaced When Shared

When you use custom fonts, there’s a possibility that PowerPoint will replace them if you share the deck with others. To avoid this try embedding the font in the presentation. PowerPoint allows this as long as the font file type is TTF or OTF. All you have to do is to click File > Option > Save, and then check the box that says, “Embed fonts in this file.” 

Keep in mind that this will likely increase your file size, so choose “Embed only the character used in the presentation” if you need to be wary of your file size. 

You can also share the font file itself when you’re sending the deck to others that need to edit your deck. PowerPoint will replace custom fonts with standards ones if you don’t embed the custom font, so this can be a great way to ensure your coworkers are also using the custom font and keeping your brand consistent. Keep your custom font file in an easy-to-find location for when you need to send it out.

Present Online 

This is especially helpful when you want to share your PowerPoint via online hosting without having to embed the custom font (or increase your file size). Your audience may or may not have your custom font installed in their version of PowerPoint. But by taking this route, you can ensure whatever custom font you have used will appear on the audience’s end without worrying if the custom font has been installed. 

Companies with digital asset management platforms (DAMs) or learning management systems (LMS) often allow readers to view their content online. Broadcast Slide Show is a feature that lets you livestream your presentation to an online audience. 

Consistency is Key

Much like all the other aspects of your company’s identity, consistency is key to how you present yourself, your brand, and your products or services. Using your brand’s custom font in your PowerPoint templates and presentations is a simple, yet effective way to authentically represent your company no matter who you are presenting to.

3 Ways to Livestream Your PowerPoint Presentation

Don’t let distance get in between you and your audience. Livesteaming your PowerPoint allows you to still be the face of your presentation. Several online platforms can bring your presentation out of the boardroom and into digital spaces. These enable you to reach a wider audience without having to sacrifice your personal presentation style.

While many people may have figured out workarounds to livestreaming, the truth is there are many options, which are not too difficult to navigate once pointed in the right direction. Here are three ways you can livestream your next PowerPoint presentation.   

Broadcast Online from PowerPoint 

Microsoft itself offers a safe, reliable means to broadcast your PowerPoint presentation online to remote audiences (for PowerPoint 2013 and newer versions).

First, find your presentation and open it up. In the File tab, you can start livestreaming your presentation through the Share button.  

Next click the Present Online button. A dialog box will generate a custom URL for your presentation. You can then copy the link to send directly to your audience.

Once they’ve received the link, click Start Presentation. Viewers will then be able to see your presentation as you guide them through each slide in real time. 

This highlights how Presenter View will appear only on your screen. Your audience will see your slide show as you present it. 

Once you’re done, simply hit the End Online Presentation in the Present Online tab. 

This option is convenient when meeting in person is not possible. However, the slight downside is that some of your original deck’s features may be compromised. All transitions will automatically be set to “fade” from the audience’s view and a file size limit may be imposed on your upload. 

In this situation, a concise deck is more advisable for livestreaming to minimize the lag in your loading times. 

Use Office Mix  

Office Mix is a free downloadable add-on for Office 365 subscribers. It makes livestreaming presentations much easier.  

Office Mix retains more content such as audio, video, polls, and quizzes than broadcasting through PowerPoint alone. These features are helpful for presenters seeking to maximize audience engagement. using their deck. Consider reviewing each feature to see which will work best in your presentation, especially as you are livestreaming.

In the Mix tab, you can see Quizzes Video Apps

The platform also features “live digital inking.” This is a more hands-on approach that enables you to guide the audience using video, audio, and illustrations. Office Mix offers several helpful tutorials on their site for navigating these useful features.  

Office Mix requires an internet connection to share your presentation. However, your audience will be able to review your slides after you’ve concluded the presentation. And because Office Mix gathers audience data and feedback for in-depth analysis you can keep track of how your presentation went over with your audience and maximize on keeping track of after-presentation impact.

Upload to Online Platforms 

This third option offers the least audience interactivity in the moment but can maximize your audience reach. And it may be the easiest to execute. 

If the previous options are unavailable, you can upload and design your presentation on deck hosting platforms such as SlideShare. 

Publishing your slides online will allow you to reach out to a wider audience. While you can configure the presentation to be viewed by selected viewers only, default settings keep your deck open for public viewing. Adding tags to your presentation makes it easier to search online, further enabling mass sharing. 

These online platforms often require compressing your presentations to a size that websites can handle. While uploading to online platforms can be limited in file size, audiences will be able to view them at their own pace which can be a great benefit for a leave-behind aspect to your presentation.

Livestreaming Design Elements to Enhance Viewer Experience

Your deck plays a key role in the impact of your presentation and there are many ways to make your presentation accessible.

Because the presentation is being streamed from your source, you won’t need to worry about losing any of your custom fonts. That’s a common pain when people send their decks via email. Here are a few other assets that add value and enhance viewer experience: 

  • Interstitial Graphics: Controls broadcast flow and breaks it into segments 
  • Overlay Graphics: Media that plays over the main content  
  • Alert Overlays: Pulls live data from online sources and displays over the stream 

You may notice these things on streaming platforms like Twitch. Adding these elements to your presentation can give you a leg-up over other presenters and help you stand out with your audience.

Planning for the Future

Being able to present your deck effectively online will help amplify your message and showcase your skills as a presenter to your audience even while remote. And while working from home or hybrid interactions continue to be the norm, it’s essential to utilize all the tools you have at your disposal. Livestreaming solutions have made it so much easier to deliver a smooth online presentation experience. Take these tips as unique chances to improve your skills for your next big presentation.