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Making Big Statements with Minimalist Design

Minimalist graphic design is timeless. The phrase “less is more” best encapsulates the core philosophy of minimalism, which is to strip down a design to its most essential elements.  

Designs are simplified to avoid unnecessary fluff that may distract audiences from the message. However, there are nuances to understand to effectively utilize minimalist designs.

Now you must be asking, “what makes minimalist designs stand out?” In this article, we will analyze the subtlety of minimalist design and how it applies to PowerPoint presentations. 

Understanding the Essentials 

The key parts of every PowerPoint presentation include: 

  • Graphics – The geometric elements that structure the different sections of a slide. 
  • Content – The text featured throughout the presentation.  
  • Images – The use of photos, illustrations, icons, etc. 
  • Color – The overarching color scheme related to the brand or presentation topic.  
  • Font type – The “tone of voice” in which the text is speaking.  

It becomes a game of balance and moderation with these elements to keep the design as minimal as possible. The amount of text you feature on each slide. By keeping your text minimal, you’re naturally provided with more to work with for graphics. These graphics can then consist of clean and crisp lines to subtly guide the eyes across each slide. It’s crucial to understand how all these different elements interact and complement each other. Balance is the key difference between minimalist design and simply adding black text onto a white background. By doing away with unnecessary clutter, you help your audience sift through the information and grasp the message you are expressing. 

Embracing Negative Space  

One of the defining characteristics of minimalist design is the effective use of negative space. Sometimes called white space, this refers to the empty spaces between the various elements in a design. You can use these spaces to create breathing room for the different elements of your slide. As a result, your audience will naturally have an easier time visually deciphering what are the key points of each slide.

We’ve all seen our fair share of PowerPoint slides filled to the brim with text and images. The common logic in these cases is the fear of the audience missing out on important information. However, it’s actually the lack of negative space that makes it difficult for audiences to quickly decipher what’s important in the slide. An overly packed slide just leaves audiences struggling to filter through the mess.

To give yourself more negative space to work with, you will need to carefully condense your content. Start this process by zoning in on the key points of your presentation. Once you’ve decided on what’s truly essential to your message, single out each of these points into its own slide or section. By boiling down the information to its most essential points, you’re left with significantly less content featured on each slide. The greater negative space in your slides will help create a structure that naturally guides your audience’s attention as you go through the presentation. 

Keeping Things Simple  

Simple designs help audiences to stay focused on your message. That is because humans are very visual beings. Our brains are constantly processing vast amounts of visual data at any moment. When faced with too much content packed into a single slide, your audience will just be subjected to bad a case of information overload.

Simple, minimalist designs are a way of filtering out all unnecessary information and giving audiences all they need to know directly. As the presenter, it’s your mission to effectively deliver your message. Above all, minimalism allows you to focus on and emphasize the key points of your presentation. 

Consider how often people are bombarded by so much information. It’s refreshing to sit through a presentation with content that feels curated and carefully designed. You can maximize the message of each slide by simply focusing on your most essential pieces of information. It does not matter how much you are trying to say, it’s about the quality and intent of what’s being said.