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5 Data Visualizations Every B2B Executive Needs

In 2014, scientists from MIT discovered the brain processes an image in as little as 13 milliseconds. 

In short, it’s better to use an image when discussing complex concepts. Visuals are more relatable than text. The past few years have proven it. Reporting tools have significantly reduced the burden of reading material. 

This is great. After all, most B2B executives are overbooked. Between meetings and all-day conference calls, there’s no time to review long reports.

But, as every transaction and every site visitor creates data, expressing the data correctly can be a “life and death” decision. After all, you don’t want to miss a key insight your competitor uses to their advantage.

With data visualization tools, key details are conveyed in a non-time-consuming manner. It is more efficient and accurate than other means of data representation. 

5 Business Graphs Every B2B Executive Needs to See 

Company Dashboards 

Company dashboards align teams to core business goals, tracking shared progress. This benefits morale and encourages teamwork. 

Visuals are easier to follow when combined with animations, trend charts, and color-coded marks. Always remember to tie all relevant data to larger goals.    

Account Revenue Reports 

Start by identifying the best and worst performers by account. Use these when making informed decisions.

Focus on the how much people engage and usage rates. Update the ideal customer profile you want to focus on. Low-performers also present opportunities for improvement and growth. 

Quarterly and Monthly Revenue Reports 

Revenue reports provide a quick overview of the progress made towards goals. 

Consider day-by-day breakdowns and revenue attributed to each department, product, and service. The reports can create greater insights into the trends that are guiding your business. They can also help you plan for the future, and understand the past. 

B2B Sales and Service Leaderboards 

A little friendly competition among sales and customer service teams reinforces good behavior. It motivates them to improve their approach. 

Tracking these data points identifies the highest performers and specific qualities to impart to others, improving the team’s overall process. This also highlights training opportunities and best practices. Comparing your teams is less about who is better and more about the synergy of the entire group.

Capacity and Resource Planning  

Capacity and resource modules provide internal stakeholders with visually accurate representations of their employees. They also lend insight into the material requirements of each project. These modules help take care of scheduling and track budget requirements. 

Data visualization tools are ideal for unifying relevant information.

Make your data easy to understand and analyze. Use data visualization tools not only to make your presentations more pleasing to look at, but to ensure that everybody is on the same page. 

If you need assistance, let us know. At SlideGenius, we’ve helped countless people in your position to represent data in the most effective and communicative fashion. Just reach out for a free quote. We’ll be happy to help.

Transforming Your Sales Pitch into a Video 

Given the current state of the world, entrepreneurs need to adjust their ways of getting business done. Traditional pitches and in-person meetings are taking a back seat for now, making way for email-only pitch presentations. While it may seem like an impersonal method for landing deals, there are methods of optimizing your pitch to achieve the best results. 

Instead of simply emailing your presentation to prospects, you can transform it into a video.  

We at SlideGenius have made it a business being presentation experts. Our team of PowerPoint presentation designers know how to craft winning pitches from the ground up. Our experience allows us to apply the knowledge we’ve built to other presentation mediums like videos and graphic design.   

In this article, we will delve into elements that make transforming your PowerPoint presentation into a video more effective.

Record Your Speech 

Pitches are best delivered with a speech. However, that luxury is lost when you need to resort to email-only presentations. Turning your presentation into a video allows you to inject your speech back into your pitch.

Recording your speech should be the first step to creating a presentation video, as it will act as a timing guide for your slides. This process will also help you review areas of your pitch that could possibly be shortened or extended. 

Ultimately, having a voice to guide along the message will help your prospects gain a stronger grasp of your pitch.   

Customize Depending on Your Client 

You will eventually land multiple opportunities with different prospects, and while you may have one core presentation to offer, that does not mean each video should be the same. You can create custom versions of your video that directly addresses different clients.  

First, review your speech for any areas where you may feel like addressing clients by name. Mark these sections as lines that you will record multiple versions of for each of your clients. It will then become a matter of editing in these unique lines into the different versions of your video. 

This will take a bit of extra time to complete, but adding in more personalized touches will go a long way. 

Be in the Video 

The main goal of utilizing video is to replicate the in-person meeting experience as much as possible. Recording a voice-over to accompany you pitch will help guide your message, but prospects will still want to know who exactly they’re dealing with. To solve this, start your pitch with footage introducing yourself and your company. No need to use footage of yourself throughout the entire presentation, as that may end up being both time consuming for you and distracting for your client. Having introductory footage will be enough to “put a face” on your presentation.  

You’ll be making a clear appearance to your audience, so carry yourself with the utmost professionalism in these snippets.

Remember to dress as if you’re meeting with your clients personally, and make sure your background is free of anything distracting or discriminating. Use this time to project how you want to be perceived by your client.

Finish with a Call-to-Action 

Be sure to feature another snippet of yourself delivering a strong call-to-action to your prospect. CTAs are effective on their own in directing audiences to what their next move should be. Using a video of yourself once again delivers that final punch with greater impact. It will also give your prospects something more personal to latch on to as the video concludes.

SlideGenius Is Your Presentation Expert

Need help in creating a video? Our team of presentation designers, writers and animators all collaborate diligently to consistently create winning presentation materials. The refined skills of our team has led to over one million slides for 3,000+ global clients

Our wealth of experience ensures clients are treated to world-class design standards that boost credibility in the boardroom.

As the world’s premier PowerPoint presentation design agency, let us help you inject new life into your presentations and raise your business towards new heights. We have helped spark million-dollar growth for businesses around the world. We believe that the growth of our clients is our biggest measure of success. Reach out now to get a quote free of charge.

Contact us today!

Guy Kawasaki’s 10-20-30 Rule of Presentation: Is It Still Relevant?

PowerPoint is a superb presentation tool, which, when used properly, can be an effective visual aid for professional speakers. However, at the hands of inexperienced presenters who have no eye for design, it can pave the way for jarring and unattractive slides. Sad to say, the world of business is teeming with mediocre pitch decks that just don’t do justice to the ability of PowerPoint as a great design tool. Luckily, there are people like Canva Chief Evangelist Guy Kawasaki, who can show the noobs how it should be done.

Kawasaki advocated the 10-20-30 Rule of PowerPoint, which banks on the idea that a presentation “should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than thirty points.” Although Kawasaki originally meant it to be for entrepreneurs and startup business owners, this principle applies to all types of presentations. By following this guide, you can avoid basic design mistakes and ultimately stand out from the vast sea of lackluster presentations.

Why the 10-20-30 Rule Is Still Relevant Today

Kawasaki’s 10-20-30 Rule is now more than a decade old—which, we can all agree, is a long time for any virtual rule to last, what with the constant and almost abrupt changes that technology makes. Although PowerPoint is still the most recognizable presentation design software in recent history, it’s no longer the only one in the book. A number of competitors have emerged, and they all have something relevant to offer. Apart from that, the way people use PowerPoint has also changed over time. What was invaluable ten years ago may not be as important today.

Now, this begs the question, “Does the 10-20-30 Rule still apply?” The answer to this is short and clear: YES. Here’s why.

1. Presenters still cram several ideas into one pitch deck

You’d think a lot would have changed in a decade. Well, in the case of slide design, nothing much has improved. Don’t get this wrong—agencies specializing in presentation design have emerged over the years, and they have indeed elevated the landscape. It’s the individual presenters who have not fully maximized the use of PowerPoint that still make the same mistakes. Despite professionals strongly advising against it, some presenters still cram multiple ideas into one pitch deck. They don’t even bother to filter out the unnecessary stuff and keep only the crucial points.

When Kawasaki first proposed the 10-20-30 Rule, he also suggested ten topics for the ten slides: the problem, the solution, the business model, the underlying technology, sales and marketing, the competition, the team, projections and milestones, status and timeline, and summary and call to action.

So, instead of filling each slide with unnecessary text, why not try to identify your salient points first and then make an outline based on them? Use as little text as possible to avoid overwhelming your audience with a barrage of ideas. If a slide isn’t necessary, do away with it. Remember, you are the star of your presentation, not the pitch deck or anything else. Make sure that all focus remains on you.

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2. People’s attention span is getting shorter

We’re in the age of social media, where the best content is short and fast, and people appreciate things that don’t take much of their time. Attention spans have become relatively shorter, to the point that people are growing more impatient and expectant—a combination that is hard to satisfy. This is why when delivering a presentation, you should always be considerate of your audience’s time and level of interest. Even if you’re given an hour to present, prepare for a speech that doesn’t last longer than twenty minutes. You can use the extra time for setting up your equipment or holding a Q&A session.

“But I have something extremely important to say!” you may argue. Well, that doesn’t give you any reason to go beyond the suggested time frame. Look at the universally-renowned TED talks for example. Speakers are expected to deliver their speeches in eighteen minutes or less, and that doesn’t stop them from communicating brilliant ideas that are worth sharing. If you have an imposed time constraint, you’ll be forced to edit your speech meticulously until it’s down to the bare necessities. Trim down all the unnecessary stuff so that you can put the essentials in the spotlight.

3. Readability is a crucial factor that’s still being sidelined

The number one rule of presentations is simple: The audience is the boss. Wherever you are in the presentation process, you should always put the audience at the forefront of your mind. For instance, what the people at the front row sees should be seen clearly by those in the back row as well. Optimize the font size of your text to accommodate all of your viewers. When you see people squinting at your slide, take the hint that something’s not right.

Another reason why the thirty-point-font rule should still be reinforced today is that it encourages you to limit the number of words you can put in each slide. As much as possible, don’t overload your slides with information. Remember that your goal is not to bombard your audience with ideas but to present them a few that can change their lives for the better.

Is the 10-20-30 Rule Absolute?

Kawasaki didn’t mean for the 10-20-30 Rule to be followed religiously by all business presenters. Instead, he set it as a guideline for people who want to improve their pitch decks, and consequently, their presentations. The fact remains that each situation is unique, so there’s no hard-and-fast rule that applies to all.

Instead of asking how many slides you should have, ask how many you need. Also, instead of going with the twenty-minute rule, why not apply the one-third rule, which suggests that the length of your speech should be one-third of the time you’re given? That is, after all, the original idea that Kawasaki proposed. Lastly, you can bend the thirty-point-font rule without breaking it. It’s only the minimum font size recommended, so you can go higher as the number of words you use per slide decreases. Ultimately, you should consider the needs of your audience instead of mindlessly jumping on the bandwagon. What works for one may not always work for you.

Twelve years later and Kawasaki’s 10-20-30 rule is still as effective as ever. If every presenter applies these three timeless guidelines, the landscape of presentation design will be infinitely better.

Resources:

Dlugan, Andrew. “The 10-20-30 Rule: Guy Kawasaki on PowerPoint.” Six Minutes. June 10, 2010. sixminutes.dlugan.com/10-20-30-rule-guy-kawasaki-powerpoint

Jonson, Laura. “The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint: Does It Still Work?” SlideShare. January 13, 2016. blog.slideshare.net/2016/01/13/the-102030-rule-of-powerpoint-does-it-still-work

Kawasaki, Guy. “The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint.” Guy Kawasaki. December 30, 2005. guykawasaki.com/the_102030_rule

“Follow the 10-20-30 Rule for a Perfect PowerPoint Presentation.” Presentation Load. October 17, 2013. blog.presentationload.com/follow-10-20-30-rule-perfect-powerpoint-presentation

Visualizing Data for Better Marketing Presentations

Marketing is about analyzing and applying data to provide consumers with the products they want.

Advancements in technology and computer science have been providing marketers newfound access to incredible amounts of data to capitalize on. However, it emphasizes the need for marketers to effectively visualize their data to better express their messages.

For most people, raw data can be overwhelming and unappealing to look at. Not everyone is a data wiz, after all. 

Visualized data amplifies key pieces of information and communicates clearer messages, saving both time and brainpower.

When there’s just too much data for any ordinary person to handle, visualizing it can make things easier to swallow. People need to understand what they are seeing for them to start acting on it. In this article, we will break down the best practices when visualizing your data.

Tell a Story 

You must be thoughtful in your use of data. Look at each bit of information as if they were carefully placed pieces in the overall narrative of your presentation.

Having too much information risks muddying your desired message. This is a common issue that many marketers fall into.  

Having a concrete narrative structure to your presentation helps audiences follow the flow of information. Visuals, especially when used to extrapolate large chunks of data, greatly improve the audience’s ability to internalize what is being conveyed in front of them.  

Adjust for Your Audience  

As you craft your presentation, consider to whom you’ll be talking. Potential consumers or C-level investment partners? Or maybe it’s just your internal marketing team? Whoever it may be, each of these groups have their own sets of expectations and level of understanding. 

The average Joe has no immediate concern about current spending trends in the market. He wants to know how a product can significantly improve aspects of his daily life. The data you provide must match accordingly with the type of people you will be talking to.

Design for Comprehension  

The beauty of graphic design is that it can make big data more digestible. However, there’s no “one size fits all” when it comes to effective visual design. Charts are a good example for presenting data, but it’s important to know about the various types and their best uses.

  • Bar – for comparing discrete examples  
  • Line – for continuous data sets
  • Pie – for illustrating pieces of a whole  

Here are some tips for making more effective designs: 

  • Label everything featured on the chart. Audiences must know what all the pieces are before they can understand the whole. Someone who needs to clarify what data set is being talked about will always put a halt on your presentation.  
  • Use colors to create cohesion in your design. Contrasting colors will make elements stand out, thus helping audiences pinpoint the specific information they’re looking for. Be wary of the associated meanings behind certain colors (e.g. red as a signifier for danger), depending on your intended message.  

Create Greater Context  

It’s good to assume that your presentation can (and will) be passed along to others without the benefit of accompanying verbal narrative. Having this in mind means that it rests heavily on the visuals to communicate as much information as possible in a manner that can be understood on its own. It’s important to create designs with enough context so the impact of your message can be felt with or without verbal support. 

For example, let’s say you are charting marketing-qualified leads (MQL’s) over time. Plot that against other variables which may drive fluctuations in MQL’s, like website traffic, paid investment or frequency of events. This might help you determine whether overall web traffic is irrelevant, but paid investments are critical.

Don’t Mislead Your Audience 

Be consistent with how you present data. Once you start using graphs that show zero as the baseline, then all graphs that follow should be uniform to that standard. Don’t change your scale unless it’s pertinent to the data set, and then call it out. While it can be tempting to make that 3% increase look like 50%, it can come off as deceitful. 

If you (or your team) is pulling data from tools like Google Analytics or Hubspot, be sure you fully grasp the details of your data points (e.g. what’s included in the site conversion rate, how you’re categorizing a new user, what is the criteria for SQL versus MQL.) Having a better understanding of data will ultimately lead to better designs.  

SlideGenius is Your Presentation Expert 

Need help visualizing data?

We are the world’s premier PowerPoint presentation design agency. With over one million slides for +3,000 global clients under our belt, we’ve amassed a wealth of experience about creating winning presentations. 

Our team of presentation designers, writers and animators collaborate diligently to ensure every presentation is a successful sales tool. Let us help you inject new life into your presentations and raise your business towards new heights. Contact us today! 

Transitioning to a Virtual Work Environment

In recent years, the technology behind virtual conferencing has greatly advanced. Some of the world’s biggest companies have made it a norm to broadcast conferences seamlessly for the whole world to see. Take Apple, for instance. Millions seemingly pause their lives to tune into the company’s bold product reveals every year. 

These events are connections made on a global scale and will only improve along with the advancements in technology. 

In an office setting, virtual meetings and workspaces can be as easy as logging into your email.

Solutions are so robust that collaboration can take place at nearly any scale. 

As high-speed data becomes more widely accessible, setting up reliable online workspaces becomes easier. People no longer need to fully rely on enterprise-grade Wi-Fi systems to provide them with powerful connections. 

With the right tools and protocols, professionals can work seamlessly from anywhere.

Why Transition to Virtual Work Environments? 

There are several factors to consider when transitioning to virtual spaces. 

Uncontrollable Circumstances

Sometimes, creating a remote work environment is the only feasible option to keep business operations going. Travel issues, workforce availability or even unforeseen disasters can greatly hinder an organization’s ability to be physically present for an ordinary office setting. 

Online workspaces provide employees newfound agility by enabling them to work from where they’re most comfortable. Even when situations may seem dire, having a robust online system will allow a company to keep moving forward.  

Costs Need to Be Reduced

Running an office space can become very costly in the long run, especially for startups or downsizing companies. Applying virtual workspaces for staff to work remotely will ultimately save the company on rent costs. Alleviating this heavy burden allows companies to reallocate their resources to more valuable assets.  

Integration with Virtual Systems

As technology advances, it’s natural for growing companies to show interest in following the same path. New platforms and solutions are constantly emerging, boasting more effective methods of boosting productivity. The proposition making work easier is always an exciting offer to companies seeking to maximize the time and capabilities of their workforce.

Can Face-To-Face Meetings Be Replaced? 

Programs like Skype, Zoom and Slack allow seamless and protected collaboration from anywhere in the world. The capabilities of these platforms have enabled businesses newfound connectivity and productivity.

Team leaders can dutifully rally their sales team using just their laptop. Training sessions with oversees employees can be conducted seamlessly. Deals with new clients can even be closed without ever having to step into the same room.  

There are, however, still some aspects of face-to-face meetings that cannot be fully captured by these new virtual meeting environments.

Participants are more engaged in physical environments because of tangibility. Nonverbal cues are also more effective when meeting face-to-face. These aspects carry great weight for people who desire to experience more personal connections in their work environment.

Technology is greatly moving forward, but there are still some experiences that are near impossible to replicate. 

The Do’s and Don’ts of Virtual Meetings

Virtual meetings may not involve physical presence, but professionalism is still a must. When conducting an online meeting, whether with internal or external parties, it’s important to consider the following: 

Dos 

  • Display a dynamic, attention-grabbing presentation
  • Use multiple engagement technologies 
  • Come prepared 
  • Eliminate distractions 
  • Dress the part 

Don’ts 

  • Make overly long presentations
  • Engage for the sake of engaging 
  • Speak too fast or too slowly 

SlideGenius Is Your Presentation Expert 

Are you planning to hold your next big meeting online? 

From PowerPoint presentations to animated marketing videos, we create a variety of presentation materials that boost the communication capabilities of our clients.

We make it our mission to help companies drive better business. We have helped spark million-dollar growth for businesses around the world… our greatest measure of success.

Reach out now to get a quote free of charge.

What the Coronavirus Has Taught Us About Video Conferencing

Following the outbreak of the coronavirus, millions of employees and students were forced to stay at home. These social distancing measures led governments, companies, and schools to employ strict work-from-home policies. 

Demand for video conferencing and digital conferencing software skyrocketed. 

Surge of Video Conferencing Needs 

Working from home drove companies like Google, Microsoft, and Zoom to offer their software for free to accommodate the growing demand from users. 

Depending on which software you choose, these can connect either a small group of five or large audiences of at least 150 people.

Transitioning from In-Person to Virtual Environments 

Some may say that in-person events are incomparable, especially for brands, because they make distributing content and building networks easier and more authentic. 

Is it, however, the most effective way to connect with people? 

A virtual event is similar to its in-person counterpart. It’s highly interactive and versatile depending on specific goals and purposes. 

Virtual Conferencing Benefits 

With video conferencing platforms, working together, even remotely, has never been easier. Apart from reducing travel costs, you also get: 

  • Improved communication 
  • Better business relationships 
  • Wider reach 
  • Simplified management and usability 
  • Increased productivity 

The best thing about virtual conferences is that you can be in two—even several—places at once.

Choosing the Right Video Conferencing Platform 

Over 98% of medium and large businesses, and two-thirds of small organizations, are likely to purchase video conferencing solutions in the years to come. 

Apart from the increase in remote work driving the need for video conferencing solutions, today’s companies need to communicate with employees from multiple offices. 

If you’re looking to integrate this into establishing a virtual environment for your workplace, choose a service tailored to your business needs. Consider these factors before you make your purchase. 

Locations of End Users 

Some platforms are restricted in specific regions or countries. Before making a purchase, make sure that everyone will have access to it. 

Recording Capabilities 

You may want to go over the highlights of your meeting on a later date. These keep track of where you are in terms of project management or if you’re remotely interviewing potential employees. 

Mobile Optimization 

Make sure that your video conferencing platform is available on both desktop and mobile devices to ensure equally positive experiences. 

Screen-Sharing Capabilities 

Collaborations may occur in and out of the workplace. This feature allows you to give feedback and apply changes to plans or design in real time. 

Application Integration 

If you frequently use third-party applications like PowerPoint during your meetings, you may want to look for a platform that allows you to import presentations and documents. 

There are also platforms that allow plug-ins that make it easier for you to schedule your next meeting and take notes without having to switch applications.

Before the coronavirus forced people to keep their distance, technology had already begun to give them the means of coming together. 

As businesses continue to work across greater distances, the advantages of working in virtual environments will become more and more clear.